Powerlifting – BarBend https://barbend.com The Online Home for Strength Sports Fri, 23 Feb 2018 19:07:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.4 Powerlifter Stefanie Cohen Deadlifts 507 lbs for a 4x+ Bodyweight Triple https://barbend.com/powerlifter-stefanie-cohen-deadlifts-507/ https://barbend.com/powerlifter-stefanie-cohen-deadlifts-507/#respond Fri, 23 Feb 2018 19:07:58 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27233 A three rep PR heard around the powerlifting community. Powerlifter Stefanie Cohen recently added another massive deadlift PR to her impressive powerlifting resume. Yesterday, Cohen shared a strong 230kg (507 lb) deadlift triple that tops any of her previous three reps bests. Cohen didn’t share her bodyweight in the video, but three days ago she […]

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A three rep PR heard around the powerlifting community.

Powerlifter Stefanie Cohen recently added another massive deadlift PR to her impressive powerlifting resume. Yesterday, Cohen shared a strong 230kg (507 lb) deadlift triple that tops any of her previous three reps bests.

Cohen didn’t share her bodyweight in the video, but three days ago she shared a squat video and pointed out she’s sitting around 126 pounds. We’re guessing she’s not far from that in the deadlift video (if at all), which would make this deadlift a 4x+ bodyweight triple.

Currently, Cohen is prepping to lift at the 2018 Arnold Classic in the Animal Cage. In Instagram video’s description she writes, “Been having a rough time adjusting to sumo again after a long block of mostly conventional. Happy to see that strength is coming back right in time for the Arnold!! I’ll be lifting at the Animal Cage Saturday at 3pm.”

A post shared by Stefanie Cohen (@steficohen) on

If you’re already a Cohen fan, then this set may not surprise you all too much. Her deadlift strength can only be described as legendary, and she continually reminds us why it’s that way. For context, it wasn’t too long ago when Cohen was talking about breaking the quadruple bodyweight deadlift feat, then aiming to pull 500 lbs.

[Flashback to when Stefi Cohen pulled a 525 lb single at 123 lbs bodyweight!]

In addition to the impressive triple video above, Cohen has also pulled an extremely heavy single off of 3″ blocks. A week ago, she deadlifted 260kg (575 lbs) off blocks, which is a ridiculous 4.5x bodyweight pull if we account for her 126 lb bodyweight. It also makes us wonder, could this weight be possible for her one day?

A post shared by Stefanie Cohen (@steficohen) on

Cohen currently holds the 123 lb women’s all-time deadlift world record at 485 lbs, which we’re guessing will fall at some point this year.

It’s going to be exciting to see what 2018 has in store for Cohen, and even more exciting to see what she can do in the Animal Cage at the Arnold Classic.

Feature image screenshot from @steficohen Instagram page. 

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72kg Powerlifter Jessica Buettner Deadlifts 220kg At 2018 CPU Nationals https://barbend.com/powerlifter-jessica-buettner-deadlifts-220kg/ https://barbend.com/powerlifter-jessica-buettner-deadlifts-220kg/#respond Thu, 22 Feb 2018 15:45:37 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27164 The 2018 Canadian Powerlifting and Bench Press National Championships are currently underway in Calgary, Alberta. They started on February 20th and will run through the 24th. There have been some strong performances, but none may be stronger than -72kg junior powerlifter Jessica Buettner’s performance yesterday. We’ve written about Buettner’s epic deadlift strength before, but yesterday’s […]

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The 2018 Canadian Powerlifting and Bench Press National Championships are currently underway in Calgary, Alberta. They started on February 20th and will run through the 24th. There have been some strong performances, but none may be stronger than -72kg junior powerlifter Jessica Buettner’s performance yesterday.

We’ve written about Buettner’s epic deadlift strength before, but yesterday’s performance may have taken the cake. She opened on the day with a 200kg (440 lbs) pull – which is only 2kg under her current 202kg IPF Junior World Record – and finished with a 220kg (485 lb) deadlift to seal a Canadian Record and unofficial IPF Junior World Record.

Check out the Instagram video below from Powerlifting Coach and Dietitian Manny Prieto where he writes in the desciption, “Another #CanadianRecord and Unofficial #WorldRecord for @djessicabuettner in the #72kgweightclass: a 220 kg/485 lb #Deadlift to go along with her record 173 kg/381.3 lb Squat! With a 90 kg/198.4 lb Bench, she finishes with a 483 kg/1064.8 lb Total, also an Unofficial World Record!”

As Prieto states above, Buettner’s final deadlift allowed her to finish with a 486kg (1,064 lb) total. This total earned her the CPU Junior Total Record and was also an unofficial IPF Junior World Record. Buettner held the previous CPU Junior Total Record with 444.5kg, so this total tops it by a massive 38.5kg.

In addition to her epic deadlift, Buettner also put up strong squat numbers, which were briefly mentioned above. To conclude her attempts, she finished with a 173kg (381 lb) squat that earned her a CPU Junior Squat Record and another unofficial IPF Junior World Record.

This performance was Buettner’s best showing to date, and she absolutely crushed her previous bests and multiple records. With two days left in the 2018 CPU Powerlifting and Bench Press National Championships we’re pumped to see what other records are broken.

If you’re interested in watching the final two days of competition, then check out this.

Feature image screenshot from @bigredmanny Instagram page. 

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Honestly Ask Yourself: Are You Working Hard Enough? https://barbend.com/ben-pollack-hard-work/ https://barbend.com/ben-pollack-hard-work/#respond Wed, 21 Feb 2018 19:25:03 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27123 If you’ve been following me on social media, you know that I’m a pretty conservative guy. I’m usually talking about topics like, Cutting back on how much work you do in the gym  Saving some energy for when it counts Not going to true failure or testing your 1RMs too often That’s because I find […]

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If you’ve been following me on social media, you know that I’m a pretty conservative guy. I’m usually talking about topics like,

That’s because I find that most people who care enough to go online and try to read and learn about training already work really damn hard. It’s the others – the ones who don’t really bother to improve themselves inside or outside the gym – who need to be working harder. So chances are, since you’re reading it, this article really doesn’t apply to you.

A post shared by Ben Pollack (@phdeadlift) on

So why write it in the first place? A couple reasons:

  • Maybe (like many people) you work hard but wonder if you should be working EVEN HARDER! If so, this article should give you some reassurance.
  • Maybe you know a friend or even have a client who needs to step it up in the gym. Instead of having a hard conversation that might not be received all that well, you can share this article with them (casually, of course).
  • Maybe you don’t actually work all that hard, and you really do need to step your game up!

Whatever the case may be, I think the information here is useful, and as long as one person learns something from it, it’s worthwhile in my view. So, on that note, let’s get started.

Why Work Hard in the First Place?

I once consulted with an author who was writing a pretty interesting book about basketball. The guy’s name was Asher Price, and he was a smart dude – did his undergrad at Yale and graduate work at Oxford and Columbia – but he had zero athletic background. Asher wanted to learn to dunk a basketball, and, well-educated as he was, pretty quickly realized that he’d need to get stronger to do that. So he asked me for help.

Before coming to me, he had been working with a trainer at his local Gold’s Gym, and he noticed something a bit “off” about the routines he was assigned. It was kind of like carrying groceries, he said: yeah, it felt heavy, but he always knew he could handle the weight. In fact, he always knew he could add a little bit more if he needed to – just like you can always carry one more grocery bag as long as you can fit it around your arm. And with this type of training, Asher said, he wasn’t really getting any stronger.

This is why you need to work hard in the gym. Strength training, at its core, is all about progressive overload, or constantly adding weight to the bar. At first, you might be able to lift more and more weight without working all that hard, but pretty soon, that won’t be the case, and in order to do more, you’re going to have to push it. It’s that simple.

(If you’re interested in what happened to Asher, you can pick up his book on Amazon. Honestly, I’m a football guy and don’t even like basketball at all, so I haven’t read it, and have zero idea whether it’s any good. If you check it out, let me know!)

So How Hard Do You Really Need to Work?

On the other hand, as you’ve probably gathered from some of my other writing, working too hard is also a recipe for failure. To keep that progressive overload going, you do have to work hard – but you also have to recover sufficiently. Work too hard, and it won’t be possible to recover. It’s all about finding that balance.

A post shared by Ben Pollack (@phdeadlift) on

(Some people claim that there’s no such thing as overtraining. As long as you’re eating and sleeping enough, you’ll always recover. These people are very wrong and probably don’t work all that hard, so that’s why they don’t have problems with recovery.)

So, what constitutes “hard enough but not too hard?” Well, as with everything, it’s individual, but these are some of my guidelines to determine whether I’m working at the right level of effort:

  • In a hard workout, I need to have at least one set where a little part of me is unsure whether I can complete the scheduled reps and weight. Note, that’s a little part – if I genuinely don’t think I can hit my planned numbers, then I planned wrong.
  • A hard workout itself requires focus, before and during training. If I can waltz casually into the gym, go through the motions, and still hit all my numbers, it wasn’t a hard workout. If I don’t have at least a set or two where I need to meditate or visualize beforehand in order to perform the set with proper form, I’m not working hard enough. On the flip side: if thinking about the workout ahead of time makes me anxious, or if I have to constantly use self-talk just to make it through, then I’m working too hard or planned too aggressively.
  • A hard workout requires intra-workout nutrition. If I can finish a session without some type of intra-workout shake and don’t feel flat, weak, or otherwise “off,” then I wasn’t working very hard. If I’m so nauseated from training that I can’t stomach a shake, well, that’s too much.

And here are some clear-cut signs that I pushed too hard:

  • I missed a rep. When your goal is strength, training to failure is usually a mistake, because it’s pretty hard – mentally and physically – to come back after a miss. On a related note, if you’re in the middle of a rep and you know you can’t finish it, just bail (safely). Don’t push through hopelessly. You’ll just tire yourself out and risk injury.
  • I can’t focus and don’t have an appetite later in the day. Unfortunately, these are lagging indicators: things that become apparent only after a training session, when it’s too late to adjust. Lagging indicators are things to note in your training log so that you can adjust in the future.
  • I get hurt. This, of course, is the worst-case scenario, and usually it means that I’ve been pushing too hard for quite a while and ignoring signs from my body that it’s time to back off. Fortunately, it’s been a while since I got hurt (unless you count the time I broke a rib on a new belt because I didn’t realize how stiff it was).

Finally, keep in mind that not every workout needs to be a hard one! There’s a ton of value in having light workouts, and that value can come from a lot of different things (like providing an opportunity for active recovery, to improve technique, to target smaller but lagging muscle groups, and much more). A good training program will incorporate both hard and easy workouts appropriately.

Why Not Just Use Rated Perceived Exertion (RPE)?

In case you’re not familiar with RPE-based training, here’s a great introduction:

You might know that I’m not the biggest fan of RPEs for most lifters, and the article you’re reading right now is why. Unless you’re already very familiar with how hard you need to work, it’s very difficult to incorporate RPE-based effort regulation into a program. Please don’t twist my words here: that’s difficult, not impossible.

Mike Tuchscherer clearly explains how to do so in his books and articles, but it’s a process that can take years without the help of a very skilled coach. Yes, I’m well aware of studies and coaches that argue otherwise. I’m telling you my opinion based on what I’ve experienced as both an athlete and a coach who’s worked with many lifters of all different levels. If RPE-based training works well for you, then by all means, stick with it!

But if you’ve struggled using RPEs, or if you’ve read about them and can’t quite wrap your head around the concept, it’s probably because you realize that hey – it’s really hard to tell whether you could have performed one, two, or three more reps in a given set unless you’ve done enough training to failure to have a really good idea of what your limit is. And, as I mentioned above, I don’t think training to failure is all that great of an idea. So for most people, I believe that a qualitative assessment of effort – alongside a well-written percentage-based program – will work really well.

Wrapping Up

Again, if you’re reading this, you’re probably already working hard enough, but if you’re not sure for any reason, hopefully now you have a better idea of what to shoot for. Don’t make this stuff more complicated than it needs to be.

One last note: don’t be fooled by the guys who claim that they’re going to outwork everyone else; nor by the ones who act think they care more because they (allegedly) work harder. Hard work is good, but it’s far, far from the be-all and end-all of productive training. If you try to turn it into that, you’re setting yourself up for an ugly disappointment.

Editors note: This article is an op-ed. The views expressed herein and in the video are the authors and don’t necessarily reflect the views of BarBend. Claims, assertions, opinions, and quotes have been sourced exclusively by the author.

Feature image screenshot @phdeadlift Instagram page. 

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Robb Philippus Smokes a 915 lb Squat In Prep for “Animal Cage” https://barbend.com/powerlifter-robb-philippus-915lb-squat/ https://barbend.com/powerlifter-robb-philippus-915lb-squat/#respond Wed, 21 Feb 2018 15:22:28 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27106 Robb Philippus, aka “Quads Like Robb”, is heading into the 2018 Arnold Classic looking as strong as ever. In less than two weeks, Philippus will be lifting at the “Animal Cage”, which is a showing of some of the strongest lifters in the sport and is hosted by the supplement company Animal Pak. Athletes like […]

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Robb Philippus, aka “Quads Like Robb”, is heading into the 2018 Arnold Classic looking as strong as ever. In less than two weeks, Philippus will be lifting at the “Animal Cage”, which is a showing of some of the strongest lifters in the sport and is hosted by the supplement company Animal Pak. Athletes like Dan Green, Rob “Da Savage” Hall, and many others are regular lifters at the cage.

Last night, Philippus shared a strong squat video in wraps that highlighted an easy 915 lbs. In his video’s description Philippus writes, “915 to the hole and back x1 last squat until the @animalpak #CAGE2018” 

Check it out below.

Philippus is no stranger to the “Animal Cage” and has actually hit a few notable powerlifting milestones in it. His first time in the cage was in March 2016, and it was at this time he hit a huge PR 905 lb naked knee squat.

On his website, Philippus provides a little more detail into that lift saying,

“First time in the Animal Cage was March 2016 with a 905 naked knee squat, it was a surreal experience for sure! Half way through the lift, I saw that dark tunnel and decided if I go out, I go out…next thing I knew I was racking the weight! Jess said half way through the lift it seemed like time stood still! haha.”

Now fast forward to March 2017 and Philippus found himself back in the cage. This time instead of going naked knee he squatted with wraps and doubled a 900 lb squat because he had the CETS US Open quickly approaching.

At the CETC US Open in April 2017, Philippus finished with a 959 lb squat in wraps on his third attempt, and this was after he missed this same weight on his second attempt.

What will Philippus end up hitting this year in the cage? We’re not completely sure, but we’ll be sitting here patiently waiting with excitement.

Feature image screenshot from @quadslikerobb Instagram page.  

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Ben Pollack PRs With an 805-Pound Squat https://barbend.com/ben-pollack-805lb-squat/ https://barbend.com/ben-pollack-805lb-squat/#respond Tue, 20 Feb 2018 17:52:57 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27075 Powerlifter, all-time world record holder, and BarBend contributor Ben Pollack added five pounds to his personal record in the high bar squat with a monstrous 805-pound (365.1kg) lift somewhere around 200 pounds bodyweight. For a PR, this lift is remarkably fast and it looks pretty easy, given Pollack was able to say the words, “Fucking […]

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Powerlifter, all-time world record holder, and BarBend contributor Ben Pollack added five pounds to his personal record in the high bar squat with a monstrous 805-pound (365.1kg) lift somewhere around 200 pounds bodyweight. For a PR, this lift is remarkably fast and it looks pretty easy, given Pollack was able to say the words, “Fucking easy!” as he was finishing the lift.

A post shared by Ben Pollack (@phdeadlift) on

Pollack admits that the depth might not pass muster in a competition, but emphasized in a discussion on Reddit that he hasn’t missed a squat on depth in any federation since 2012. This is a training lift, and there are plenty of benefits of squatting a little higher than parallel every now and then. (Though we think his hip crease did look pretty close to parallel.)

[IPF world record holder Ray Williams doesn’t hit competition depth when he trains, either. Here he is explaining why.]

Note that if Pollack had successfully made this lift on a competition platform at competition weight, it would be just six pounds short of the 198lb world record for the raw squat with knee wraps, set by Russian Alekseyev Vyacheslav this past December.

Pollack posted a caption with his lift that read in part,

here’s a #PR 805 #squat (my first over 8) – after having done only #highbar #beltless work with less than 600 for the past month or more. I don’t plan on getting weaker 😂 In all seriousness, even though the weight moved well, I shouldn’t have attempted it without a better plan. I needed to move something heavy to help deal with being pretty darn #stressedout over (hopefully) finishing school and moving on with my life.

A post shared by Ben Pollack (@phdeadlift) on

Pollack has been spending more time bodybuilding lately and is on a mission to prove that it won’t necessarily make you weaker. The squat PR, coupled with last week’s beltless deadlift PR of 750 pounds (340.2kg) above, makes for some pretty compelling evidence.

Featured image via @phdeadlift on Instagram.

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Heavy Leg Day Coming Up? Watch This For Motivation First https://barbend.com/rogue-fitness-nick-weite/ https://barbend.com/rogue-fitness-nick-weite/#respond Mon, 19 Feb 2018 20:18:27 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27045 “At the 2018 Arnold I’m hoping to squat over nine, bench press low-to-mid sixes, and then deadlift anything over 800 pounds I’d be happy with that for a full meet, but I’d like to take a stab at 881.” – Nick Weite The above is a quote pulled from the second Rogue Fitness “Road to the […]

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“At the 2018 Arnold I’m hoping to squat over nine, bench press low-to-mid sixes, and then deadlift anything over 800 pounds I’d be happy with that for a full meet, but I’d like to take a stab at 881.” – Nick Weite

The above is a quote pulled from the second Rogue Fitness “Road to the Arnold” video from this year, which is a series that’s following athletes in lead up to the 2018 Arnold Classic. This video features veteran powerlifter and 8-time Arnold Classic competitor Nick Weite.

Currently, Weite competes as a 275 lb athlete and plans to compete equipped in both the Rogue Grand Prix meet and the Pro Deadlift event. Weite’s first Arnold Classic experience came in 2009 when he took home first in the 125kg weight class at the USA Powerlifting Raw Challenge, and was also awarded Best Lifter.

The Rogue Fitness video below follows Weite through his day-to-day where he serves as a police officer for St. Louis City Police Department.

Last year, Weite totaled 1,022.5kg (2249 lbs) at the Arnold Grand Prix, which earned him second behind powerlifting legend Blaine Sumner. On the day, Weite went 5/8 (passing on his third deadlift attempt) and has since made it a point that he wasn’t pleased with his performance.

“Powerlifting is really mental, when weight’s on the bar, if you don’t think you’re going to be able to lift it, you’re not going to lift it, so you need to go with the mindset that the weight’s already been done. It’s just you getting up and going through the motions.” – Weite

[Did you miss the first “Road to the Arnold” video from 2018? Check it out, here!]

With only two weeks left until the 2018 Arnold Classic kicks off, we’re pumped to see what kind of numbers Weite is capable of putting up. He’s been crushing some heavy lifts in his recent training videos. Check out his easy 825 lb squat single below from early February.

A post shared by Nick Weite (@usapl275) on

Will Weite be able to top his previous Grand Prix totals? Time will tell, but from what we can see, we’re optimistic that he can.

Feature image from Rogue Fitness YouTube channel. 

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Check Out “Dear Brian”, a Moving Special Olympics Powerlifting Documentary https://barbend.com/documentary-brian-beirne/ https://barbend.com/documentary-brian-beirne/#respond Mon, 19 Feb 2018 19:30:25 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27030 In roughly five months, the Special Olympics USA Games will kick off in Seattle, Washington. This year’s Games are set to take place from July 1st-6th. Every year, the Special Olympics USA Games bring out thousands of athletes from every state across the nation to compete in a lineup of 14 individual and team sports. […]

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In roughly five months, the Special Olympics USA Games will kick off in Seattle, Washington. This year’s Games are set to take place from July 1st-6th. Every year, the Special Olympics USA Games bring out thousands of athletes from every state across the nation to compete in a lineup of 14 individual and team sports.

One of the sports included in the Special Olympics USA Games lineup is powerlifting, which is what brings us to the focus of this article. The recently produced documentary titled “Dear Brian” by Red Leaf Film & Upland Film Co. highlights the journey of New Jersey powerlifting athlete Brian Beirne.

“I’m a powerlifter. I know that I’m strong, but you know, you always have to look at yourself like you’re weak. After you hit a PR in a meet or something, maybe for a week you’re like, ‘yeah I’m pretty strong’, but a week later you’re back to it. Oh, I need to get bigger, I need to get better.” – Brian Beirne.

The documentary below follows Beirne through his day-to-day life and talks about his journey and growth as a powerlifting athlete at War Horse Barbell. Growing up, Beirne went through a traumatic experience that would change his life forever. When Beirne was younger, he underwent a tonsillectomy (a typically standard surgery for many young people) and experienced a hemorrhage later that night when he was home.

“It changed everything, the analogy I use is like a pebble hitting a pond. The waves that kind of emanate for years and years. When you think you want to move your fingers, your brain says move and they move, but all the connections were pretty much gone,” Jay Beirne says in the opening minutes of the documentary.

His father talks about how he spent years in physical therapy working to build back the basic connections needed for everyday movement, and he believes this is what sparked Brian’s love for powerlifting. In addition, the Special Olympics were another major bridge that connected Brian to a community that has since given him a greater purpose.

“He doesn’t quit, he doesn’t complain, he just puts his head down and he does the work. He’s an extraordinary young man and I’m really proud.” – Jay Beirne

If you have time, we recommend checking out the 7-minute documentary above. Beirne is not only motivating, but a true reminder of how strength sports can provide life with a bigger purpose and create community.

Feature image screenshot from Upland Film Co. Vimeo channel.

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Kimberly Walford Deadlifts a Huge 250kg, Seven Kilos Over Her World Record https://barbend.com/kimberly-walford-250kg-deadlift/ https://barbend.com/kimberly-walford-250kg-deadlift/#respond Mon, 19 Feb 2018 18:30:13 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27033 Thirty-nine-year-old powerlifter Kimberly Walford made a deadlift this weekend that exceeded her IPF raw world record by seven kilograms (15.4 pounds). That record is held in the -72kg weight class and while it’s not totally clear how much she weighs right now, this is nonetheless an extraordinary lift with some very extraordinary hype. This clip […]

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Thirty-nine-year-old powerlifter Kimberly Walford made a deadlift this weekend that exceeded her IPF raw world record by seven kilograms (15.4 pounds). That record is held in the -72kg weight class and while it’s not totally clear how much she weighs right now, this is nonetheless an extraordinary lift with some very extraordinary hype. This clip is worth watching before you try your next max deadlift.

A post shared by Kimberly Walford (@trackfu) on

Who wouldn’t PR with Ray Williams cheering them on like that?

Swedish world record holder Isabella Von Weissenberg popped into the comments section to say, “Incredible job Kim 😍 you’re unlimited!” to which Walford replied, “thank you Sis, I’m excited for the possibilities.”

The lift was made at a meet hosted by Walford and IPF world record holder Ray Williams called the Kim & Ray Speed Power Strength Invitational 2018, held at Speed Power Strength Gym in Oakland, California. Walford and Williams weren’t competing and lifted after the meet was over.

A post shared by Speed Power Strength (@spsgym) on

Walford holds two IPF deadlift world records in the -63kg class (221kg/487.2lb) and the -72kg class (243kg/535.7lb) as well as the -72kg world record total (540kg/1,190.5lb).

[Walford and 9 other athletes shared the reasons they started powerlifting in this eye-opening article.]

 She posted with her lift,

The Speed Power Strength crew put on amazing meet. Ray and I lifted after the meet. It felt great to pay homage to all the people who attended the meet. Thank you guys for coming , supporting, and being a part of the powerlifting family!!

At the same meet, Williams himself made a squat of 467 kilograms (1,030 pounds), a weight that’s almost 98 percent of his world record 477.5kg (1,053lb) lift from last year’s Arnold Classic. Watch his latest lift below.

[Williams took 1,003 pounds for a double just last week — read the article to hear him discuss in detail the reasons behind his squat depth.]

We’re certainly hoping the Kim & Ray Speed Power Strength Invitational becomes a regular event.

Featured image via @trackfu on Instagram.

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James Strickland Benches a Monstrous Raw 672 lb (305kg) Competition PR https://barbend.com/james-strickland-672lb-raw-bench/ https://barbend.com/james-strickland-672lb-raw-bench/#respond Mon, 19 Feb 2018 15:38:00 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=27024 Over the weekend, powerlifter James Strickland competed in The IPA No Excuses Texas State Open, which was hosted in Kindwood, Texas. He weighed in at a light 293 lbs and had the goal of making a run at the 308 lb weight class all-time raw bench press world record. After opening with a strong and fast […]

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Over the weekend, powerlifter James Strickland competed in The IPA No Excuses Texas State Open, which was hosted in Kindwood, Texas. He weighed in at a light 293 lbs and had the goal of making a run at the 308 lb weight class all-time raw bench press world record.

After opening with a strong and fast 628 lb (285kg) first attempt, he called for 672 lbs (305kg) on his second. He crushed this lift, then called for 702 lbs (319kg) on the bar, which would have awarded him the 308 lb all-time bench press world record and would top the current 701 lb (318kg) held by Scot Mendelson from 2002.

Strickland’s coach John Bryant of Jailhouse Strong wrote in his video’s description above, “672!! Competition PR for @swimhack !! Legit attempt at ATWR made!! Very proud of this man!!!”

In addition to his coach praising this insane feat of strength, Mark Bell’s Sling Shot Instagram wrote in their video description, “672 POUNDS! Someone write that man a speeding ticket. Competed at 308 weighing in at 293 lbs and took a crack at 702 lbs, which would be an ALL TIME WORLD RECORD, for a miss. This is just the beginning for @swimhack. He’s got that ATWR running on fumes and that is gonna be a light snacc when he’s done!”

Strickland is no stranger to world record attempts and strong competition benches. In fact, he also took a run at the 275 lb all-time world record back in July 2017 at the Alabama APA Raw War III powerlifting meet.

At this meet, Strickland weighed in at a light 266 lbs, and hit a 661 lb (300kg) bench on his third attempt before taking a run at the all-time world record with a granted 677 lb (307kg) fourth world record attempt.

A post shared by James Strickland (@swimhack) on

This lift above would have topped Jeremy Hoornstra’s 2014 all-time world record 675lb (306kg) bench press.

As many have pointed out in the powerlifting community, it’s just a matter of time until Strickland finds himself with one of the all-time world record benches, but which will it be?

Feature image screenshot from @jailhousestrong Instagram page. 

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These Are 32 Things Strong Women Do Not Want to Hear On Dates https://barbend.com/strong-women-dates-opinion/ https://barbend.com/strong-women-dates-opinion/#respond Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:42:29 +0000 https://barbend.com/?p=26989 Let’s set the scene. You have a date coming up with a super cool lady, and you find out soon after she’s really into lifting. Now you’re no stranger to the gym, but you’re not heavily involved in strength sports such as powerlifting, weightlifting, CrossFit, strongman, or bodybuilding, which she is, so you begin to […]

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Let’s set the scene.

You have a date coming up with a super cool lady, and you find out soon after she’s really into lifting. Now you’re no stranger to the gym, but you’re not heavily involved in strength sports such as powerlifting, weightlifting, CrossFit, strongman, or bodybuilding, which she is, so you begin to wonder, “Is there anything I should avoid saying on our date?”.

For context, we recently wrote about the seven things not to say to 2-Time CrossFit Games Champion Katrin Davidsdottir on a date, which is what inspired this article. Her video got us thinking, what else shouldn’t you say to female strength athletes on a date?

We reached out to athletes in multiple strength sports, and here’s what they had to say.

A post shared by Kristen Dunsmore (@kriis_d) on

Daniella Melo – Powerlifter

“I wouldn’t date a girl who’s stronger than me.”

Tiffany Nguyen – Powerlifter

“What makes you want to be strong?”

“You don’t think you’re more masculine than other women?”

“Why would you want to lift that much weight?”

A post shared by Tiffany Nguyen (@liftliketiff) on

Sheri Miles – Powerlifter

“I wear gloves in the gym to keep my hands soft.”

“Can I try some of your food? Let’s share dessert.”

Stefi Cohen – Powerlifter/Weightlifter

“Wow you eat a lot.”

“You’re pretty muscular, for a girl.”

“You do powerlifting, isn’t that a men’s sport?”

Jordan Weichers – Weightlifter

“Those jeans make you look skinny.”

“Are you going to eat ALL of that?”

“Flex for me. We need to see who has bigger biceps.”

Amber Abweh – Powerlifter

“Do you ever arm wrestle?”

“So do you eat a lot of protein?”

Alex Silver-Fagan – Strength Coach

“Aren’t you afraid of getting bulky?”

Aysha Haley – Powerlifter

“So can you like deadlift me?”

“How many inches around are your thighs?”

A post shared by Aysha Haley (@ayshahaleyy_) on

[Read: Female powerlifters share the weirdest comments guys say to them!] 

Meghan Scanlon – Powerlifter

“How much do you lift? Okay, and how much do you weigh?”

“In high school I squatted 400 lbs.”

Sarah Brenner – Powerlifter

“I bet you could lift me.”

Kristen Dunsmore – Powerlifter

“Are you going to eat all of that?”

Maddy Forberg – Powerlifter

“Shouldn’t you be watching what you eat?”

“Do you think your legs could crush me?”

“Are you really going to eat all of that?”

Stacia-Al Mahoe – Powerlifter/Weightlifter

“You have rough hands.”

“Aren’t you afraid you’ll look like a man.”

“Your traps are too big.”

Bonica Brown – Powerlifter

“Why do you like to lift so heavy?”

“Can you help me with my squat technique? Maybe a program?”

Emily Hu – Powerlifter

“Wow your arms are big! Wanna arm wrestle?”

Chelsea Potter – Strength Coach

“Oh you wouldn’t like that, it’s not healthy.”

A post shared by Chelsea Potter 🇺🇸 (@cheslap) on

Wrapping Up

To be honest, some of the above quotes should come as a no brainer, but for someone not involved in strength sports, it may not be so obvious. Advice going forward: if you find yourself on a date with a woman who’s involved in strength sports, then think about what you say and how it could be taken before doing so.

Editors note: This article is an op-ed. The views expressed herein and in the video are the authors and don’t necessarily reflect the views of BarBend. Claims, assertions, opinions, and quotes have been sourced exclusively by the author.

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