Dave Castro Announces New Movement Standards With 18.0 Workout

Yesterday evening, we shared an article in regards to Dave Castro’s latest CrossFit Open 18.0 (zero) announcement/hint. Later that night, CrossFit went live streaming the announcement on their Facebook from CrossFit WIT in London. At the announcement, Castro was joined by some of CrossFit’s elite athletes including Tia-Clair Toomey, Dan Bailey, Scott Panchik, and Lucas Esslinger.

As it turns out, 18.0 will be an additional workout, but not connected with the regular Open (as stated by CrossFit in the comments section). Castro led off the announcement by stating the workout is a classic CrossFit couplet with a 21-15-9 structure. The couplet’s movements will be the dumbbell snatch and burpee.

18.0 Workout Couplet Details

For Time
Reps: 21-15-9
Movements: Dumbbell Snatch + Burpee
Dumbbell Weight: Men: 50 lbs & Women: 35 lbs

This workout may not seem all that shocking, but there’s a catch. Castro also included a few new movement standards in this workout for the dumbbell snatch and burpee.

New Dumbbell Snatch Movement Standards

Last year, an athlete had the ability to switch their hands on the dumbbell while it was overhead in-between reps. For 2018, Castro has announced that an athlete must bring the dumbbell below eye level before switching their hands in-between reps.

New Burpee Movement Standards

In addition to the dumbbell snatch being slightly re-worked, the burpee also had a change in its movement standard for this workout. An athlete must set the dumbbell down next to them in the direction they’re facing and jump over as so. For example, the dumbbell will lie in the same direction you’re standing (aka parallel to your foot), and you have to complete the jump over the dumbbell with the foot completely parallel/in-line with it before doing so.

Castro also pointed out that if at any point an athlete steps back or forward during the burpee portion, then they’re technically doing the workout scaled. The Rx’d burpee entails an athlete jumping back, and then jumping forward to count one rep.

Feature image screenshot from CrossFit Facebook page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.