The Ultimate 10-Week Powerbuilding Workout Routine for Mass and Strength

You can gain muscle and strength at the same time — you just need the right program. Enter our powerbuilding workout routine.

Powerbuilding workout programs are nothing new in the world of strength sports — it’s an old product with a new label. Really, powerbuilding is a workout program that combines powerlifting-style training with bodybuilding for a one-two combination of strength and size. 

 The concept sounds simple — because, well, it is — but there’s still a bit to learn before you jump traps first into a brand new style of training. In this powerbuilding guide, we’ll cover multiple topics including:

What Is Powerbuilding?

As the name implies, powerbuilding workouts are meant to both increase strength and spark muscle gain. Powerbuilding programs are pretty varied and can be tailored to suit the competitive powerlifter who wants to max out his or her deadlift, to the weekend warrior who wants a killer beach body. These programs are accessible and customizable.

Man doing pull-up

Usually, these programs starts with compound movement — like the bench press or back squat — often in the lower rep range with a strength and power focus. Then, the lifter transitions into more focused accessory work, hitting their biceps, triceps, and shoulder muscles with lighter weight for more reps. 

Which Powerbuilding Split is Best for You?

There are many ways one can tailor a powerbuilding workout split. Typically, a more experienced gym-goer will be able to handle more volume compared to a beginner with less than six months of experience. Below, we outline the general specs one should follow, based on experience level, when setting out to design their own workout program. 

Beginners (<6 months of lifting) 

A beginner getting into powerbuilding will usually need to focus more on compound movements, or lifts that involve the movement of more than one joint. They can still train with an aesthetic goal in mind, but the building of a strong foundation will lead to better long-term success. A stronger base will allow a lifter to truly hone in on and cater accessories to their weaknesses (found through compounds) while being able to handle higher amounts of volume and intensity.

  • Training Days per Week: 3
  • Compound Movements: Squat, Bench, and Deadlift
  • Compound Sets x Reps: 4-6 sets, 6-8 reps
  • Accessory Movements Per Workouts: 3-4 movements
  • Accessory Sets x Reps: 3 sets, 8-15 reps

Intermediates (6 months – 2 years of lifting)

As one gets more experienced, they can start to add more variety to their training (hence the extra training day). By adding an overhead pressing day, the lifter can give their shoulders and torso more attention. Or, if the legs are a weak point, skip the presses and hit up the squat rack. 

  • Training Days per Week: 4
  • Compound Movements: Squat, Bench, Deadlift, Overhead Press, or a second squat day
  • Compound Sets x Reps: 4-5 sets, 4-8 reps
  • Accessory Volume: 3-5 movements
  • Accessory Sets x Reps: 3-4 sets, 8-12 reps

Advanced (>2 years of lifting)

An advanced lifter has a good amount of depth in their training history to utilize a powerbuilding program that cycles intensity and volume a little more frequently. In addition to building four days around the compound movements listed below, there’s also an additional building day for optimal muscle growth. On that day, the lifter can focus on more volume with less weight. 

  • Training Days per Week: 4-5
  • Compound Movements: Squat, Bench, Deadlift, Overhead Press, and building day
  • Compound Sets x Reps: 4-5 sets, 3-6 reps
  • Accessory Volume: 3-5 movements
  • Accessory Sets x Reps: 3-4 sets, 6-12 reps

Organizing Your Powerbuilding Workout Split

The specs above are just guidelines, but there are many ways you can structure the days of your accessory work. Two common workout splits to follow are either a push-pull style of training or a body part split. 

For the push-pull split, you can pair push-focused accessory moves with the corresponding compound exercises. For example: on your squat day, you can also do a leg press, dumbbell chest press, calf raise, and triceps extension. It’s more of a full-body approach, but they’re all pushing movements. This is a good option for beginners who require a little less volume. 

The push-pull option also allows you to familiarize yourself with certain movements since you’re training both the pushing and pulling movements twice per week. 

Or, you can strictly train legs on your squat day, your back on deadlift day, chest on bench day, and shoulders and arms on the pressing day. This is more of a body-part split and is recommended for intermediate and advanced lifters. You’ll accumulate more volume per body part, and also rest longer between body parts. 

How to Progress Your Powerbuilding Program

A key to reaching your strength and muscle goals is progression. You can’t keep lifting the same weights for the same sets and reps and expect to get bigger and stronger. The body swiftly adapts to stress, and so you need to keep adding stress (meaning more weight or more reps) to force it to re-adapt. This is why implementing a mode of progression is vital. 

The key to getting stronger is to progressively overload your reps. For each exercise, start on the low end of the prescribed rep range. You want the weight to be challenging enough. A good rule of thumb is to use a load that you can comfortably lift for two more reps than the rep count you’re aiming for. During your next workout, add one rep to both your main movement and accessory exercises. Repeat this for four weeks. Then, add a small amount of weight to each lift — even two and a half or five pounds will work — and start the process over again. 

A five-pound increase may not sound like much, but bench-pressing four sets of seven reps with 135 pounds versus four sets of seven reps with 140 pounds equals 140 extra pounds pressed in total. That’s a small increase but one that will compound over time to yield some serious strength results. If you add five pounds to your 135-pound bench press every month, then in a year, you’ll be pressing 195 pounds. That’s a formidable jump. 

The Benefits of Powerbuilding

Below are five benefits of powerbuilding programs that beginners, intermediate, and advanced lifters can gain when training with this style.

You Can Attack Multiple Physical Attributes At Once

The biggest benefit of powerbuilding programs is their ability to target strength, power, and aesthetic goals at once. That said, if you’re a bodybuilder, strongman, or serious powerlifter, you may need a program that’s a bit more focused.

It Offers Variability in Workouts

Powerbuilding programs allow a lifter to incorporate a plethora of exercises, sets, reps, and intensities to match their needs. Unlike some programs that entail a smaller pool of variability, this style program allows a lifter to be as creative as they like depending on their training history, goals, and needs.

It’s Easy to Track and Progress

 A good powerbuilding program will have a well thought out method for programming compound movements. This will come in one of the forms of periodization and will allow a lifter to easily track their main movement’s progress while avoiding burnout. Additionally, if a lifter ever feels out of it, then they can go lighter on accessories, while still giving their all in the compound.

Great for Building a Strong Foundation

Done correctly, powerbuilding programs can be a great way to build a lifter’s foundation. They build strength in important compound movements while also increasing a lifter’s proficiency in movement. A good powerbuilding program can set you up for long-term success. 

Allows for a Well-Rounded and Balanced Training Approach

Accessories are useful. These programs allow a coach or lifter to program accessories accordingly. For example, if one has a hard time out of the whole of the squat, then they can program more glute and hamstring work on their leg day. This fulfills a training weakness while targeting what’s most likely a bodybuilding weakness as well.

Who Should Do Powerbuilding?

While there is no definitive answer to this question, we feel that every individual could benefit from gaining strength, muscle, and fitness at some point in their training cycle. Below are some ideas on how to integrate the principles of powerbuilding into various populations.

Strength and Power Athletes

Strength and power athletes often have sport-specific movements they need to perform. Powerbuilding can be a viable option for lifters who are far out from a competition and are looking to build foundational strength, increase lean muscle mass, and have the ability to not devote as much time to their individual sport needs and movements. 

As the competition approaches, more energy will have to be put towards training sport-specific movements and events, which may be a good time to transition into a more sport-specific training program.

Functional Fitness Athletes

Powerbuilding is a hybrid training approach that can be very beneficial to functional fitness athletes as it works to increase strength and muscle mass. You can create and mix in skill-based movements within accessory segments to further make powerbuilding more customized to your training goals.

General Population

Powerbuilding is a good hybrid approach to develop strength, muscle mass, and improve fitness with most individuals. By diversifying one’s fitness and training, you can often attack multiple things at once, while making workouts challenging and fun at the same time.

Powerbuilding Sets, Reps, and Programming Recommendations

Below are some general guidelines on how you can attack various training goals while participating in a powerbuilding program.

dumbbell shoulder press
BLACKDAY/Shutterstock

To Gain Muscle

To gain muscle, your best bet is to drive up the overall training volume for a given muscle group during the accessory lifts, so that you can train strength on the main compound movements, then use accessories exercise to drive muscle growth. Aim to achieve 14-18 total sets per week, per major muscle group (quadriceps, hamstrings, chest, back, triceps, biceps, shoulders). You can do this by training in the five to 10, 10-15, or even 15-20 rep ranges.

To Gain Strength

Powerbuilding allows you to insert any strength progression or protocol you would like within the program. Typically, you will lift with loads between 80-90% of your one-rep max for two to five reps at a time. Be sure to account for these work sets in your weekly training volume numbers.

To Improve Muscle Endurance

If you are trying to get stronger, and also build muscle endurance in the same cycle, you will find your efforts will be counterproductive to one another. If your goal is strength, limit the amount of high rep work to just accessory exercises, machines, unilateral movements, and do not overdo them as they may impede strength progress.

You can improve muscle endurance using higher rep ranges in your accessories exercise, such as lifting in the 10-15 or 15-20 rep ranges. Be sure to count these work sets towards your total weekly volume numbers.

BarBend’s 10-Week Powerbuilding Program

Below is a 10-week powerbuilding program. Note that any exercises marked with the same number and letter should be performed as a superset, doing one move then the other with no rest between. 

Week One & Two

Day One: Squat Hypertrophy

1. Squat: 5 x 8

2. Barbell Hip Thrust: 3 x 10

3A. Dumbbell Split Squat: 3 x 8

3B. Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift: 3 x 12

4A. Single-Leg Seated Leg Curl: 2 x 12

4B. Hanging Straight Leg Raise: 2 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 30 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Hypertrophy

1. Bench Press: 5 x 7

2. Dumbbell Bench Press: 2 x 8

3A. Incline 1-¼ Dumbbell Bench Press: 3 x 7

3B. Incline Dumbbell Row: 3 x 10

4. Skull Crusher: 4 x 7

5A. Push-Up: 2 x AMRAP

5B. Pallof Press: 2 x 6

Day Three: Deadlift Hypertrophy

1. Deadlift: 5 x 4

2. Barbell Row: 4 x 5

3. Pull-Up: 3 x 7

4A. Farmer’s Walk: 4 x 40 feet

4B. Hyperextension: 4 x 10

5. Inverted Bodyweight Row: 2 x 7

Day Four: Overhead Press Hypertrophy

1. Overhead Press: 6 x 6

2A. Chin-Up: 4 x 6

2B. Kneeling Landmine Press: 4 x 8

3A. Barbell Curl: 3 x 8

3B. Dip: 3 x AMRAP

4A. Incline Dumbbell Curl: 3 x 7

4B. Front/lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5.Dead Bug: 2 x 20

Week Three

Day One: Squat Hypertrophy

Squat: 4 x 8

2. Barbell Hip Thrust: 3 x 10

3A. Dumbbell Split Squat: 3 x 8

3B. Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift: 3 x 12

4A. Single-Leg Seated Leg Curl: 2 x 12

4B. Hanging Straight Leg Raise: 2 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 40 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Hypertrophy

1. Bench Press: 5 x 6

2. Dumbbell Bench Press: 2 x 8

3A. Incline 1-¼ Dumbbell Bench Press: 3 x 7

3B. Incline Dumbbell Row: 3 x 10

4. Skull Crusher: 4 x 7

5A. Push-Up: 2 x AMRAP

5B. Pallof Press: 2 x 6

Day Three: Deadlift Hypertrophy

1. Deadlift: 4 x 4

2. Barbell Row: 4 x 5

3. Pull-Up: 3 x 7

4A. Farmer’s Walk: 4 x 40 feet

4B. Hyperextension: 4 x 10

5. Inverted Bodyweight Row: 2 x 7

Day Four: Overhead Press Hypertrophy

1. Overhead Press: 5 x 6

2A. Chin-Up: 4 x 6

2B. Kneeling Landmine Press: 4 x 8

3A. Barbell Curl: 3 x 8

3B. Dip: 3 x AMRAP

4A. Incline Dumbbell Curl: 3 x 7

4B. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5. Dead Bug: 2 x 20

Week Four

Day One: Squat Hypertrophy

1. Squat: 4 x 7

2. Barbell Hip Thrust: 3 x 10

3A. Dumbbell Split Squat: 3 x 8

3B. Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift: 3 x 12

4A. Single-Leg Seated Leg Curl: 2 x 12

4B. Hanging Straight Leg Raise: 2 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 45 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Deload

1. Bench Press: 3 x 6

2. Dumbbell Bench Press: 2 x 8

3A. Incline 1-¼ Dumbbell Bench Press: 2 x 7

3B. Incline Dumbbell Row: 2 x 10

4. Skull Crusher: 2 x 7

5A. Push-Up: 1 x AMRAP

5B. Pallof Press: 1 x 6

Day Three: Deadlift Hypertrophy

1. Deadlift: 4 x 4

2. Barbell Row: 4 x 5

3. Pull-Up: 3 x 6

4A. Farmer’s Walk: 4 x 40 feet

4B. Hyperextension: 4 x 10

5. Inverted Bodyweight Row: 2 x 7

Day Four: Overhead Press Deload

1. Overhead Press: 2 x 6

2A. Chin-Up: 2 x 6

2B. Kneeling Landmine Press: 2 x 8

3A. Barbell Curl: 2 x 8

3B. Dip: 2 x AMRAP

4A. Incline Dumbbell Curl: 3 x 7

4B. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5. Dead Bug: 2 x 20

Week Five

Day One: Squat Deload

1. Squat: 2 x 8

2. Barbell Hip Thrust: 2 x 8

3A. Dumbbell Bulgarian Split Squat: 2 x 8

3B. Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift: 2 x 8

4A. Single-Leg Stability Ball Curl: 2 x 8

4B. Hanging Weighted Knee Raise: 2 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 50 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Strength

1. Bench Press: 5 x 5

2. Dumbbell Bench Press: 2 x 8

3A. Incline 1-¼ Dumbbell Bench Press: 3 x 7

3B. Incline Dumbbell Row: 3 x 10

4. Skull Crusher: 4 x 7

5A. Push-Up: 2 x AMRAP

5B. Pallof Press: 2 x 6

Day Three: Deadlift Hypertrophy

1. Deadlift: 4 x 4

2. Barbell Row: 4 x 5

3. Pull-Up: 3 x 6

4A. Farmer’s Walk: 4 x 40 feet

4B. Hyperextension: 4 x 10

5. Inverted Bodyweight Row: 2 x 7

Day Four: Overhead Press Strength

1. Overhead Press: 4 x 5

2. Chin-Up: 4 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 3 x 8

3B. Preacher Curl: 3 x 7

4A. Close-Grip Push-Up: 2 x 10

4B. Hammer Curl: 2 x 8

5A. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5B. Waiter Walk: 3 x 20

Week Six

Day One: Squat Strength

1. Squat: 5 x 5

2. Barbell Hip Thrust: 3 x 8

3A. Dumbbell Bulgarian Split Squat: 3 x 6

3B. Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift: 3 x 8

4A. Single-Leg Stability Ball Curl: 2 x 8

4B. Hanging Weighted Knee Raise: 2 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 55 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Strength

1. Bench Press: 5 x 4

2. Incline Barbell Press: 3 x 5

3A. Single-Arm Dumbbell Bench Press: 3 x 7 (each arm)

3B. Single-Arm Dumbbell Row: 3 x 8 (each arm)

4. Skull Crusher: 4 x 7

5A. Rope Pushdown: 2 x 12

5B. Kneeling Cable Crunch: 2 x 25

Day Three: Deadlift Deload

1. Deadlift: 2 x 4

2. Barbell Row: 2 x 5

3. Pull-Up: 2 x 7

4A. Farmer’s Walk: 2 x 40 feet

4B. Hyperextension: 2x 10

5. Inverted Bodyweight Row: 2 x 7

Day Four: Overhead Press Strength

1. Overhead Press: 4 x 4

2. Chin-Up: 4 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 3 x 8

3B. Preacher Curl: 3 x 7

4A. Close-Grip Push-Up: 2 x 10

4B. Hammer Curl: 2 x 8

5A. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5B. Waiter Walk: 3 x 20

Week Seven

Day One: Squat Strength

1. Squat: 5 x 4

2A. Goblet Squat: 2 x 12

2B. Box Jump: 2 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Step-Up: 3 x 8

3B. Seated Leg Curl: 3 x 15

4A. Side Plank: 3 x 40 seconds

4B. Hanging Weighted Knee Raise: 3 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 60 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Strength

1. Bench Press: 4 x 4

2. Incline Barbell Press: 3 x 5

3A. Single-Arm Dumbbell Bench Press: 3 x 7 (each arm)

3B. Single-Arm Dumbbell Row: 3 x 8 (each arm)

4. Decline Skull Crusher: 3 x 6

5A. Rope Pushdown: 2 x 12

5B. Kneeling Cable Crunch: 2 x 25

Day Three: Deadlift Strength

1. Deadlift: 3 x 3

2. Deficit Deadlift: 2 x 5

3. Weighted Pull-Up: 3 x 5

4A. Cable Pull-Through: 3 x 10

4B. Kettlebell Suitcase Carry: 3 x 40 feet

5A. Face Pull: 2 x 12

5B. Medicine Ball Side Slam: 2 x 8

Day Four: Overhead Press Strength

1. Overhead Press: 4 x 4

2. Chin-Up: 4 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 3 x 8

3B. Preacher Curl: 3 x 7

4A. Close-Grip Push-Up: 2 x 10

4B. Hammer Curl: 2 x 8

5A. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5B. Waiter Walk: 3 x 20

Week Eight

Day One: Squat Strength

1. Squat: 4 x 4

2A. Goblet Squat: 2 x 12

2B. Box Jump: 2 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Step-Up: 3 x 8

3B. Seated Leg Curl: 3 x 15

4A. Side Plank: 3 x 45 seconds

4B. Hanging Weighted Knee Raise: 3 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 60 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Deload

1. Bench Press: 2 x 4

2. Incline Barbell Press: 3 x 5

3A. Single-Arm Dumbbell Bench Press: 3 x 7 (each arm)

3B. Single-Arm Dumbbell Row: 3 x 8 (each arm)

4. Decline Skull Crusher: 3 x 6

5A. Rope Pushdown: 2 x 12

5B. Kneeling Cable Crunch: 2 x 25

Day Three: Deadlift Strength

1. Deadlift: 3 x 3

2. Deficit Deadlift: 2 x 5

3. Weighted Pull-Up: 3 x 5

4A. Cable Pull-Through: 3 x 10

4B. Kettlebell Suitcase Carry: 3 x 40 feet

5A. Face Pull: 2 x 12

5B. Medicine Ball Side Slam: 2 x 8

Day Four: Overhead Press Deload

1. Overhead Press: 2 x 4

2. Chin-Up: 2 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 2 x 8

3B. Preacher Curl: 2 x 7

4A. Close-Grip Push-Up: 2 x 10

4B. Hammer Curl: 2 x 8

5A. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5B. Waiter Walk: 3 x 20

Week Nine

Day One: Squat Strength

1. Squat: 4 x 3

2A. Goblet Squat: 2 x 12

2B. Box Jump: 2 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Step-Up: 3 x 8

3B. Seated Leg Curl: 3 x 15

4A. Side Plank: 3 x 45 seconds

4B. Hanging Weighted Knee Raise: 3 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 3 x 60 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Strength

1. Bench Press: 4 x 3

2. Incline Barbell Press: 3 x 5

3A. Single-Arm Dumbbell Bench Press: 3 x 7 (each arm)

3B. Single-Arm Dumbbell Row: 3 x 8 (each arm)

4. Decline Skull Crusher: 3 x 6

5A. Rope Pushdown: 2 x 12

5B. Kneeling Cable Crunch: 2 x 25

Day Three: Deadlift Strength

1. Deadlift: 3 x 2

2. Deficit Deadlift: 2 x 5

3. Weighted Pull-Up: 3 x 5

4A. Cable Pull-Through: 3 x 10

4B. Kettlebell Suitcase Carry: 3 x 40 feet

5A. Face Pull: 2 x 12

5B. Medicine Ball Side Slam: 2 x 8

Day Four: Overhead Press Hypertrophy

1. Overhead Press: 4 x 6

2. Chin-Up: 4 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 3 x 8

3B. Preacher Curl: 3 x 7

4A. Close-Grip Push-Up: 2 x 10

4B. Hammer Curl: 2 x 8

5A. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5B. Waiter Walk: 3 x 20

Week 10

Day One: Squat Deload

1. Squat: 2 x 5

2A. Goblet Squat: 2 x 12

2B. Box Jump: 2 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Step-Up: 3 x 8

3B. Seated Leg Curl: 3 x 15

4A. Side Plank: 2 x 45 seconds

4B. Hanging Weighted Knee Raise: 2 x AMRAP

5. Weighted Plank: 2 x 60 seconds

Day Two: Bench Press Strength

1. Bench Press: 3 x 3

2. Incline Barbell Press: 2 x 5

3A. Single-Arm Dumbbell Bench Press: 2 x 7 (each arm)

3B. Single-Arm Dumbbell Row: 2 x 8 (each arm)

4. Decline Skull Crusher: 2 x 6

5A. Rope Pushdown: 2 x 12

5B. Kneeling Cable Crunch: 2 x 25

Day Three: Deadlift Strength

1. Deadlift: 3 x 2

2. Deficit Deadlift: 2 x 5

3. Weighted Pull-Up: 3 x 5

4A. Cable Pull-Through: 3 x 10

4B. Kettlebell Suitcase Carry: 3 x 40 feet

5A. Face Pull: 2 x 12

5B. Medicine Ball Side Slam: 2 x 8

Day Four: Overhead Press Hypertrophy

1. Overhead Press: 4 x 5

2. Chin-Up: 4 x 5

3A. Dumbbell Shoulder Press: 3 x 8

3B. Preacher Curl: 3 x 7

4A. Close-Grip Push-Up: 2 x 10

4B. Hammer Curl: 2 x 8

5A. Front/Lateral/Rear Raise: 3 x 21 (7 reps each)

5B. Waiter Walk: 3 x 20

Optional Fifth Day (for Weeks 1-10)

1A. Kettlebell Windmill: 3 x 6

1B. Goblet Squat: 3 x 8

1C. Kettlebell Swing: 3 x 12

2A. Medicine Ball Slam: 2 x 10

2B. Dumbbell Z-Press: 2 x 8

2C. TRX Row: 2 x 6

3A. Weighted Sled Pull: 2 x 20 feet

3B. Banded Monster Walk: 2 x 20 feet

Frequently Asked Questions

How many days a week can I powerbuild?

Like any program, a skilled coach can program as many days a week as one would like during a powerbuilding program. That said, it is suggested that you take at least one day off from training. Keep in mind that the more training you do across the week doesn’t mean you can exceed weekly training volume ranges, but rather this allows you to do less volume per day, with the trade-off that the sets and reps you do on any given day will be done with greater emphasis on quality reps (since you won’t be exhausted after doing 10-15 sets of other exercises in the same workout.

Can I do the Olympic lifts during a powerbuilding program?

Yes. Adding in the Olympic lifts (snatch and clean and jerk) can be done during a powerbuilding program if you make sure that you control the overall training volume and stress throughout the program. I often will program lifts from blocks or hangs to minimize excessive pulling volume off the floor for the lift, and will make sure to not overdue full squat positions in the snatch and clean if I am using a more aggressive squat and lower body growth protocol.

Can you gain muscle on a powerbuilding program?

Definitely. Powerbuilding is a great way to increase strength (lifting in the three to eight rep range), and drive muscle hypertrophy in the mid-range as well (8-15 rep range). A combination of increasing loading (intensity), training volume (sets and reps), and the ability to offer variety into training programs make powerbuilding a great way to train and gain muscle.

Featured image: BLACKDAY/Shutterstock