GoFit Cotton Lifting Strap Review

We receive free products to review and participate in affiliate programs, where we are compensated for items purchased through links from our site. See our disclosure page for details.

GoFit is a company designed to support in-gym and at-home workouts. Founded in 1999, their mantra revolves around three words: “Train, Recover, Repeat.” This philosophy is the inspiration behind their lifting equipment, which is designed to support a “fit” lifestyle.

You’ll commonly see GoFit’s equipment in personal training and “Globo” style gyms. This company isn’t typically marketed to the competitive strength athlete, so when we got our hands on a pair of the GoFit Cotton Lifting Straps, I was curious to see how they compared to others on the market.

Since this is a versatile lasso single-loop style strap, I used them for a variety of movements including a barbell row, deadlift, and power clean.

Click HERE to see the best price on the GoFit Cotton Lifting Strap.

Feel

The GoFit Cotton Lifting Straps are exactly as their name depicts them to be: they’re your standard cotton strap. One thing I liked and noticed was that the cotton they use feels a little softer than some other cotton straps I’ve experienced. The cotton has a little more give, which was great for avoiding immediate chafing from increased friction.

While the straps were softer and had a little give to them, I realized they stretched somewhat when I used heavier weights. This would be a turnoff for those looking to perform frequent maximal loaded lifts with these straps. In regards to chafing, these straps chafed a little bit, but less than other cotton straps I’ve tried. While they’re softer, it’s worth noting, these straps still took a few lifts to break in, which is standard with cotton straps.

[Curious about the best lifting straps for you? Check out our full rundown of the top straps on the market here!]

Durability

These straps held up well during my experiences with them; there were no immediate signs of wear and tear issues. An issue I could see, like mentioned above, was the actual stretching of the strap. They weren’t the best strap at snapping back to their original length when placed under heavy loads. The last thing a lifter wants is a strap to have cotton that’s become stretched, this could lead to possible early rips. I could also see an issue with early fraying of the material when used on newer knurling.

Material

The cotton of these straps created a positive and negative reaction for me. For recreational purposes I enjoyed that the cotton is a little softer; my assumption would be that GoFit makes them this way to accommodate their target market. With a softer cotton, they break in quicker and don’t give that initial rope burn feeling on the wrist. The edge of the strap is merrowed, which is great to prevent early fraying.

The negative reaction spurs from my serious strength athlete point of view. When I did heavy rows, the softer cotton stretched and made the bar feel less secure in my hands. The last thing a lifter needs to worry about is a stretched cotton when focusing on their exercise. Also, from I noticed, there is single stitching at the loop, which could lead to early ripping.

Size

The size of the GoFit straps was pretty standard compared to other lasso styled straps. They’re 1 ½ inches wide and average in length. I like a 1 ½ inch width: it promotes bar security by giving the option of completely covering the bar. The length allowed me to wrap the bar multiple times if I wanted to. For someone with smaller wrists or who wants to feel the bar a little more, the 1 ½ inch width could be a turn off.

Price

These are your standard, recreational lifting cotton straps and the price point definitely matches that. The GoFit Cotton Lifting Straps start around $4.99, which is on the lower-end of lifting strap, especially lasso styled straps. While these straps do cost less, the serious lifter should account for their durability and material. They may not last as long, which would require a faster turnaround when buying a new pair of straps.

Rating 1-5 (5 being the highest)

Feel: 4

Durability: 2.5

Material: 3

Size: 3

Price: 4.5

Final Word

The GoFit Cotton Lifting Straps were your standard cotton lifting straps and held up well in a recreational lifting setting. Their cotton is a little softer than others on the market, so those with sensitive skin will appreciate the feeling of these.

If you’re a serious strength athlete, you may benefit from looking into other options and spending a little extra for a pair that holds weight better. The cotton stretched a bit under heavy stress, so if you frequently lift heavy with straps, a brand made specifically for that could be a better option.

All in all, the GoFit Cotton Lifting Straps performed how you think a lasso strap would and could be a solid option for the recreational lifter.

Comments

Previous articleEstablishing Standards in Strongman: Are You Strong Enough for Success?
Next article13 Undeniable Benefits of Deadlifts
Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.