Lasha Talakhadze Talks to IWF About Being Named Georgia’s ‘Athlete of the Year’

Two days ago, the IWF released a press release highlighting that Georgia named +105kg weightlifter Lasha Talakhadze ‘Athlete of the Year,’ along with his quotes on the topic. This award came for good reason, as Talakhadze had an historic year for the sport of weightlifting. If you follow Talakhadze on Instagram, then you probably already saw and heard this news when he posted about back in late December.

In the IWF’s press release, Talakhadze said it was a happy moment for him and stated, “This year has been a good year for the Federation, and Georgia has won a lot of weightlifting victories. Today, this work has been appreciated by the Olympic Committee, which is a good moment and it gives me more incentive for future success.”

[Read the full recap of Talakhadze’s historic performance at the 2017 IWF World Championships here.]

In addition to awarding Talakhadze for his accomplishment, delegates present listened to the explanation of the Georgian’s preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

By now, chances are you’ve heard about Talakhadze’s year in weightlifting, but in case you haven’t we’ll catch you up to speed. In November, Talakhadze hit a 220kg snatch at Georgian Nationals, which was an unofficial all-time world record, and topped his current competition best of 217kg (set back in April at the European Championships).

Fast forward to the IWF World Championships roughly a month later, and there was a ton of hype behind what Talakhadze would hit on a World stage. Weightlifting fans wondered, ‘Would Talakhadze attempt the 220kg snatch again for a new world record?’ Oh yes, he would, and he would crush it with relative ease.

In addition to hitting the 220kg snatch for a new all-time world record, Talakhadze would also go on to set a new all-time total record with an insane 477kg. It goes without saying that the Georgian ‘Athlete of the Year’ was well earned.

Feature image from @lashatalakhadzesport Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.