Old Training Footage Shows 77kg Lu Xiaojun Deadlift/Clean Pulling 270kg Beltless

Very few athletes possess the same level of what seems like unlimited raw strength as 77kg Chinese weightlifter Lu Xiaojun. He’s as decorated as he’s strong with two Olympic medals in the last five years, including a 2012 Olympic gold medal and 2016 silver medal.

Yesterday, Ma Strength, a Chinese Weightlifting outlet, shared an older video on their Instagram page highlighting Xiaojun smoking a 270kg (594 lb) deadlift single. The lift could also be a clean pull, but that’s dependent on the viewer’s discretion. The caption states that this pull is about 3.5 times Xiaojun’s bodyweight (77kg).

You can truly see Xiaojun’s power with the initial bar movement off the floor. The first sixish inches are crazy quick, which would make sense in regards to how much Xiaojun can clean. Also, note how his back and torso maintain a perfect angle with no sign of flexion.

A video posted by Ma Strength (@mastrength) on


Whether you’re a powerlifter, weightlifter, or recrational lifter, a lift that’s 3.5 times an athlete’s bodyweight is no joke. In addition, Xiaojun isn’t belted and has on lifters, which adds to the length the weight needs to be pulled (as opposed to flat shoe).

On the topic of shoes, the video discusses how Xiaojun drives through the ball of his foot, as opposed to the heel. Ma Strength then discusses how this allows him to lift the weight in a similar fashion to Olympic lifts and teaches proper mechanics, while keeping the bar close.

The video doesn’t state how old this footage is, but our guess is that Xiaojun probably isn’t too far off the strength of this lift. He recently returned to training with his short term sights set on the Chinese National Games in September.

In his return to training video, he states in the interview that he, “Fights for Tokyo 2020,” which might be a suggestion of Xiaojun’s future if he stays healthy.

Whether you’re a Xiaojun fan or not, there’s no arguing the fact that he’s one of the few athletes who possess an insane amount natural raw power. He also continues to prove that like fine wine, some things (his strength) get better with age.

Feature image from @mastrength Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.