52kg Powerlifter Liz Craven Squats 155.5kg for New World Record

There were a handful of records broken two weekends ago at the Pacific Invitational that was held in Sydney, Australia. One of the records that somewhat got lost in rotation was Liz Craven’s world record squat. Craven claimed first for the -52kg women’s raw weight class, but not before she left her mark in the record books.

Craven squatted 155.5kg without wraps to set a new IPF world record. On top of that, this record is now the highest squat for the women’s raw no wraps category among any federation, not just the IPF.

It wasn’t the quickest squat we’ve seen from Craven, but it’s more than enough to earn her the newly established world record. Craven is currently ranked the number one powerlifter in Australia. In addition, Craven currently tops the list on IPF’s -52kg women’s classic powerlifting rankings.

From the IPF’s rankings mentioned above, four of the -52kg top five ranked women are 40+ years old. These four lifters include powerlifting legends Marissa Inda, Sofia Loft, and Olga Golubeva, and of course Craven.

It’s truly exciting that we finally got to see Craven officially claim the -52kg women’s world record. We knew it was only a matter of time until she officially made her mark in the record books. If you recall back to January, Craven squatted 155kg to unofficially claim the world record in lead up to the Arnold Classic.

At the Classic, Craven ended up squatting 154kg on her third attempt, which left her 1kg shy of claiming the world record. Four months later, she’s finally bumped off the previous record and properly inserted her name into powerlifting history.

With her new record, it’s going to be interesting to see what Craven attempts at her next meet. Will it match her current record, or will she push the limit even further?

One of her main powerlifting goals is to claim a world championship. Will she have what it takes come June if she competes at the World Open Classic Powerlifting Championships?

Feature image from @lizpowerlifts Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.