Weighing in at a lean 51.25 kilograms (113 pounds), Liz Craven is a titan in the powerlifting world. Currently the top ranked 52kg powerlifter on Earth and the top lifter in IPF Australia overall, Liz has been lifting competitively for five years, three of which have been under Mike Tuschscherer of Reactive Training Systems.

Oh, and she just broke her own world record in the raw back squat by lifting an astonishing 155kg (341lb) in a lifting belt, which is 1.5 kilograms over the record. (Check those elephant stomps before she crushes the squat.)

A video posted by Liz Craven (@lizpowerlifts) on

You don’t often see PRs broken with such smooth lifts.

Now, this lift took place during her training for the Arnold Classic, which will be held in Columbus Ohio in March of 2017, so no, it doesn’t officially count. But if you’re already breaking records during training, it’s safe to say there’s a good chance things will go well for Craven when she competes at the international powerlifting meet on the Rogue Fitness stage in Columbus.

“I think it is a very natural thing to want to get stronger,” she has said in the past. “Just on a very basic, animal level. The strongest will survive.”

A photo posted by Liz Craven (@lizpowerlifts) on

She posted the lift after completing an extraordinarily in-depth AMA on Reddit this week, where she reveals her tips for mobility (she uses a PVC pipe instead of foam rolling), why she deadlifts four times a week, her favorite prehab exercises, and how she diets and cycles fluid intake in preparation for a meet day. (It’s worth pointing out that she is one of the many athletes who avoid pre-workouts, as they make it difficult for her to focus.)

Craven noted that her main competitor at the Arnold Classic will likely be Marisa Inda, with whom she says she will be “neck and neck.” Best of luck to the two of them come lifting day!

Featured image via @lizpowerlifts on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.