Watch the Second Klokov Power Weekend With English Subtitles

The second annual Klokov Power Weekend took place in Moscow in mid-November, but it was like Christmas for Olympic weightlifters. Both active and retired international lifters assembled for some friendly competition with some unusual movements that aren’t often seen in competition settings.

Hang snatches, rack jerks, max weight thrusters, and snatch grip deadlifts were the main events in 2015’s Power Weekend. (Here’s some of our favorite footage from last year’s event.) This year, the snatch grip deadlift was swapped for the clean & strict press.

Now, at some point, most lovers of strength sports have hit a wall when trying to enjoy weightlifting meets, contests, and documentaries: a lot of them are in Russian. If you’re as big a fan as we are of everyone’s favorite weightlifting ham, Dmitry Klokov, there’s a good chance you wanted to watch footage of his second Klokov Power Weekend, but thought you’d never find it in English.

Image via CROSSLIFTING силовое многоборье on YouTube

Fortunately, the internet has provided. Not only can you watch your favorite lifts, they’ve been served to you in this neat, fifty-minute documentary with English subtitles. Watch Dmitry Klokov explain why he included and excluded certain lifts, why he found himself injecting with Diprospan, and what drove him to start holding the games. (You can even see some of the shiny new bars and plates from Klokov Equipment in action.)

Included among the competitors were athletes from Belarus, Kazakhstan, and even Australia, and the doc features interviews with several of them, including Dmitry Berestov and Dmitry Lapikov. There’s plenty of behind-the-scenes preparation (and anxiety), and despite the occasional crisis – he mentions that one athlete wasn’t welcome because of his political views – Klokov seems to be enjoying it, as he discloses that next year he’s organizing a Crosslifting amateur event.

Check out the full video below.

Featured image via CROSSLIFTING силовое многоборье on YouTube

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.