Watch 94kg Weightlifter Nathan Damron Squat 595 Pounds for 5 Reps

At this point, Nathan Damron is a bona fide phenomenon.

The 94kg American weightlifter — just off his record-breaking performance at the 2016 American Open — posted an Instagram video of a beautiful set of five back squats at 270kg (595lb) — and the way the weights are bouncing and bending the bar, you know this is some serious weight.

Damron is twenty years old, and while that might make him sound like a somewhat inexperienced lifter, he’s been cleaning and jerking since he was just thirteen years old – check him out pushing 75kg (165lb) overhead in this old video.

Nine years later, he’s one of America’s most accomplished young weightlifters. Beastly feats of strength grace his Instagram every day (a 150kg (330lb) hang snatch came soon after those squats) and he breaks records like they’re plywood. In November, he clean & jerked 205kg (451lb) in training, which was 10kg above the old Junior American record.

After this lift, he went on to win silver as a junior in the 94kg class at the 2016 USA Weightlifting (USAW) American Open in Orlando, during which he snatched 160kg (352lb), setting a new Junior American snatch record.

If that weren’t impressive enough, Damron also dabbles in tricking and can pull off a back flip… on one leg.

Talk about explosive power. Damron lives in Clemmons, North Carolina and trains under Travis Mash of Mash Elite Performance. We’re excited to see what the future holds for him, but for now, we’re just hoping the hashtag of #5slabs5reps starts to take off.

Featured image via @nathandamron94 on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.