Larry “Wheels” Williams Benches 225 lbs for Max Reps. Can You Guess How Many He Made?

If you had to guess how many reps world record holding powerlifter Larry “Wheels” Williams got on an AMRAP 225 lb bench press, what would you guess? To give some context and to aid in your guess, the top performers at the 2017 NFL Combine got around 35 reps. So now, what do you think?

If you guessed North of the top NFL prospects, then you guessed correctly. Two days ago, Williams shared a video of himself benching 225 lbs for a ridiculous 50 reps, aka 15 more than the NFL’s top combine performer. Check out the ridiculous video below.

To top it off, Williams is currently in a cut as he preps for his first bodybuilding show, and is sitting at a weight right around 260 lbs. In about five weeks, Williams will be taking the stage to compete at the NPC Gold Coast Muscle Classic, which takes place on February 3rd in California.

Over the last week, Williams and fitness YouTuber Terron F. Beckham worked on a collaboration and recorded some seriously crazy lifts. In addition to the 50 rep 225 lb bench press, Williams also benched 405 lbs for 15 reps (although he’s hit more before), and states in his Instagram video’s description that he hadn’t flat benched for about a month prior to the lift, and he’s in a caloric deficit.

If you’re a Williams fan, then these sets only add to his crazy pressing resume. Williams’ current best ever bench press in training sits at 630 lbs, which he shared back in mid-December as a throwback post.

Check out Williams’ best ever bench press video below .

And the crazy bench press videos weren’t the only sets Williams and Beckham filmed that had crazy volume. Williams also features high rep sets on his Instagram page of a seated barbell shoulder press and a high bar back squat.

For those in need of some leg volume, check out the video below of Williams high bar squatting 455 lbs for a staggering 19 reps. Watching this set alone is exhausting.

As we wrap up 2017 and move into 2018, we’re excited to see watch Williams will do in both powerlifting and bodybuilding.

Feature image screenshot from @larrywheels Instagram page. 

Comments

Previous articleBest Reviewed Pre Workout Supplements
Next articleMuscle Clean vs Power Clean
Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.