Powerlifter Ilyas Boughalem Has Made the IPF’s Heaviest Raw Bench Press of All Time

Well, that record sure got broken fast.

While the 2018 International Powerlifting Federation Championships took place over two weeks, a whole lot of world records were broken. Oftentimes the same record was broken more than once during the championship but when that record is the all-time heaviest lift of any weight class, it’s extra exciting.

We’re talking about the bench press. Algerian powerlifter Ilyas Boughalem, who lost his world record to Jaisyn Mike that same week, took his IPF world record back with this mighty smooth bench of 281.5 kilograms (620.6 pounds).

[Don’t miss the new heaviest deadlift ever made in the IPF, Ray Williams’ monster 398.5-kilogram lift.]

As the commentators said, that was fast. Very fast. That’s a lift that probably could have gone considerably heavier, but hey, he didn’t have to lift any heavier than a new world record.

Here’s Jaisyn Mike’s record from earlier that week, a 281-kilogram lift that sure looked a lot more like a 1-rep max.

Mike also broke the M1 Master’s record squat at this meet with 330kg and the M1 total record with 923.5kg.

Boughalem, anyway, obviously won the bench press in his +120kg weight class and did so by a margin of 16.5 kilograms. He came fourth overall in the superheavyweights (after Ray Williams ,Kelly Branton, and Siim Rast) squatting 342.5 kilograms (755lb) and deadlifting 280 kilograms (617.3lb) for a total of 904 kilograms (1,993lb). Yep, he benched more than he deadlifted.

We had trouble finding his pre-Mike world record of 280 kilograms (617.3 pounds), which he made in October 2017, but we did find yet another of his bench press world records, this 277.5-kilogram wrist trembler from July 2017.

[Curious as to the heaviest raw bench press of any federation? Check out our infographic.]

After this year’s Worlds, Boughalem returned to Algeria to a celebration held by his nation’s Ministry of Youth and Sports. He is very good at bench pressing.

Featured image via AerinQQ on YouTube.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.