Powerlifter Rhaea Stinn Benches a Huge 10kg Over the World Record

We imagine that having world champion Blaine Sumner watching you bench will add pounds to anyone’s PR, but we don’t want to take anything away from this outstanding accomplishment made by American powerlifter Rhaea Stinn. This equipped bench press PR is all her — watch the -72kg athlete make a jaw dropping lift of 190 kilograms (418.9) pounds below. That’s well over 2.5 times her bodyweight.

She posted the video with the caption,

There’s always more to learn with equipped lifting, which is such a huge part of why I love it! Tons of things to still play with in the next 8 weeks!!

Take a look below, or if you’re on mobile you might need to click here to see it on Instagram.

[Blaine Sumner himself explains the difference between raw and equipped powerlifting — and why he made the switch — in this excellent video!]

This is extra notable because if it had taken place in an IPF competition, this lift would have completely obliterated the current world record in her weight class. This would not have been some 500-gram victory — this is ten kilograms (22 pounds) heavier than the lift that tops the -72kg equipped women’s class right now. It was made just four months ago by 29-year-old Ukrainean powerlifter Antonina Marchenko during the European Powerlifting Championships.

You can watch that lift below, or here if you’re on mobile.

This isn’t even the first time Stinn has unofficially broken that world record this month. Coach Sumner just put up this video of her jumping into a bench meet “for fun” two weeks ago and hitting a 185-kilo bench while she was at it. Here’s the video, followed by Sumner’s caption.

My all star client @rhaeastinn has been making enormous strides lately. 2 weekends ago in the middle of her training for Worlds she jumped in and did a bench meet for fun. She ended up benching 409 pounds at 159 pounds which exceeds the current World Record. The following week she drove down to Gillette and pressed a massive 420 pounds which exceeds the World Record by 22 pounds! She also squatted 562 lbs the next day down here which equals the World Record. Her dedication to improving and putting forth the effort to get better is what makes her one of the very best in the world. Can’t wait to see what she posts at Worlds in 7 weeks!!!

That next meet will be the IPF Open World Championships in Sweden. They’ll take place between the 4th and 10th of November and it looks like we can expect some pretty awesome records to be broken.

Featured image via @rhaeastinn on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.