Watch CJ Cummings’ Jaw Dropping 185kg Clean Into Two Jerks

The USA Weightlifting athlete is showing no signs of slowing down.

Eighteen-year-old weightlifter CJ Cummings had some initial difficulty when he made the transition from split jerks to squat/power jerks in 2017, but the man has certainly come into his own and has been lifting enormous weight in his latest training sessions.

The newest lift: a titanic clean into two jerks of 185 kilograms, or 407.8 pounds. He competes in the -73 kilogram weight class though he presumably trains a little heavier, with 185 kilograms probably hovering at around 2.4 times his bodyweight.

This post brought to mind a video he uploaded to his Instagram back in February, when we watched him do another clean into two jerks, then with 182 kilos (401.2 pounds) on the bar (and a nice deep squat on the second lift).

[Throwback: Read our interview with CJ Cummings when he was just 15 years old.]

These lifts are remarkable in and of themselves, but especially when you take into account his previous competition lifts. It was only this past December at the World Weightlifting Championships that Cummings hit a Junior world record clean & jerk of 187 kilograms (412.3 pounds), a lift that was all the more nail-biting given that he’d missed his second lift of 186 kilos (410 pounds).

[Check out the VICE documentary on CJ Cummings that premiered in 2017.]

That lift also earned him a Junior world record total of 335 kilograms (738.5 pounds) and earned him 10th place overall, the youngest competitor to finish in the top 20.

If you recall, the previous year at the 2017 World Weightlifting Championships, Cummings was unable to complete any clean & jerks. Since then, however, he’s been setting records left and right, so we think it’s safe to say he’s found his feet. We can’t wait to see him compete the next time he’s on stage.

Featured image via @cj__cummings on Instagram.

Nick English

Nick English

Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.

After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.

No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?

Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.

At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.

Leave a Comment

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest News

Featured Video

Reviews

Follow Us