Check Out This Epic Split/Squat Jerk Combo Save

When Olympic lifts go wrong, there’s often not a whole lot we can do to save them. This becomes increasingly true in competition when you factor in fatigue and nerves. Yet, every once in a while you stumble across athletes like Russian weightlifter Yarkin Vyacheslav who persevere to make the epic save.

Russian weightlifter and strength coach Yarkin Vladislav recently shared a video on Instagram that highlights Vyacheslav making the epic split and squat jerk combo save we’re referencing. The video below features the insane 170kg clean & jerk save.

“Original video which was previously shared was removed by author.”

In the video’s description Vladislav writes in Russian, “Пример упорства,” which translates to “Example of perseverance” in English. We have to agree, this video may be the definition of perseverance under the bar.

In competition, it’s uncommon to see athletes able to keep their composure to save a jerk that’s edging towards the back. We’d argue that’s it’s even less common – at least we haven’t seen it – to see an athlete drop into a squat jerk to further make the save.

[Want to see more crazy weightlifting saves? Check out Jordan Weichers and Mohamed Ehab give everything fighting for their lifts.]

This epic unplanned split squat jerk combo save has weightlifters from all walks of competition tipping their hats to this athlete. This video reminded us of Icelandic weightlifter Thuridur Helgadottir’s recent double save.

Her save was much more controversial than the above splot jerk, but it did earn her three white lights. If you watch closely, her back knee never officially makes contact with the ground making it a good lift.

We’ve seen our fair share of crazy weightlifting saves over the last few months, but this video may take the cake in terms of craziest. When 170kg is going off the back, we don’t know many athletes like Vladislav that can improvise a save by dropping into a squat jerk.

Feature image screenshot from @syarkin1 Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.