Check Out Pete Rubish’s Latest 220kg Bench Press PR

Powerlifter Pete Rubish is currently in prep for a meet that will take place in a little less than three weeks. He’ll be competing at the USPA Tennessee Classic on January 13th. Rubish regularly competes in the 220/242 lb weight classes, and has gained a significant following for his strong lifts, especially with the deadlift.

To conclude 2017, Rubish has made some incredible progress on his bench press. Yesterday, he shared a training PR video that highlights a strong 220kg (485 lb) bench press. Check out Rubish’s training PR video below.

What will Rubish attempt come meet time in early January? In the Reddit thread highlighting this recent PR Rubish commented and said, “I’d like to hit 215 (474 on meet day). This pause was rushed, so this won’t happen. But I’ve put 22 lbs on my bench in 60 days, so I’m happy with the progress!”

This would be a significant improvement compared to his last meet in late October where he hit 207.5kg (457 lbs) on his third attempt. The 457 lb third attempt was also a PR, so the 474 would be a 17 lb improvement, which is no small feat on the bench press, especially in the amount of time Rubish has improved over.

Check out the 207.5kg (457 lb) bench press from the October meet below.

If you’re a Rubish fan and follow him on Instagram, then you’ve more than likely seen the impressive bench progress videos he’s been sharing. In his comment above, he mentioned that he’s added 22 lbs to his bench in 60 days.

[Watch Pete Rubish deadlift 655 lbs for a ridiculous 10-sec hold!]

Check out the last video Rubish shared in the bench cycle before attempting the 220kg bench PR. In the video’s description Rubish writes, “6×391 lbs first set. I did 4×5 after this. Did 5x5x375 to finish last cycle going into the 474 lb bench.”

With his new bench progress, we’re excited to see what Rubish ends up totaling at the USPA event on January 13th.

Feature image screenshot from Pete Rubish YouTube channel. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.