14 Year Old Weightlifter Morgan McCullough Smokes a 162kg (356 lb) Clean & Jerk

Young 14 year old weightlifter Morgan McCullough has been quietly pushing big numbers under the watchful of eye of head coach Travis Mash.

McCullough has been lifting as a Mash Mafia Weightlifting team member for quite some time, and during his tenure with the team he’s improved his numbers quite dramatically. In his latest video, he hits a clean & jerk PR, then takes a swing at the current 166kg Youth (14 & 15) American +85kg record, which was set my Ian Wilson back in 2009.

In McCullough’s video’s description he writes, “162kg/356lb PR Clean and Jerk! Then an attempt at an American Record 167kg/367lb. Made the clean but missed the jerk. #YouthPanAms2018”

We’re not going to lie, he didn’t miss that second 167kg jerk by much. To top it off, McCullough still has more than a year at this age group before he’s too old to break Wilson’s long standing record.

[Clean up and analyze your lagging clean & jerk with our in-depth guide!]

In less than eight weeks, McCullough will be heading out to compete at the 2018 Youth Pan American Championships. This year, the Youth Pan Ams are set to take place on June 3-10th, and are being held in Palmira, Colombia.

Outside of his Olympic lifts, McCullough has also been putting up some strong squat PRs, too. Five days ago, he shared a big 210kg (462 lb) front squat PR.

Currently, McCullough is weighing around 94kg, which is also the weight class he’s set to compete in. And if the front squat PR above wasn’t impressive enough, he’s also hit a pretty recent back squat PR.

[Throwback to 13 year old McCullough’s American record breaking performance at the 2016 USA Weightlifting American Open Championships!]

In Mid-April, McCullough squatted a strong 232kg (510 lb), which he made look relatively easy for being an all-out personal best.

With lifts mere kilos away from the current Youth (14 & 15) American records, we’re pumped to see what McCullough is going to do come competition day in early June.

Feature image from @mad_lifts_15 Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.