Did Weightlifter Won Jeong-Sik Clean & Jerk 200kg (2kg Over World Record)?

South Korean 69kg weightlifter Won Jeong-Sik appears to have just hit a huge clean & jerk in training. Yesterday, Shin Yong-Jin shared the video below, which features what is said to be a huge 200kg clean & jerk performed by 2-time Olympic athlete Jeong-Sik. This lift is Jeong-Sik’s heaviest clean & jerk to date.

There’s no word on what Jeong-Sik’s bodyweight is at the moment, but we’d guess he’s probably sitting a little heavier than his normal 69kg competition weight, as most elite competitors at this weight train heavier than what they compete at. Additionally, this 200kg training clean & jerk is 2kg over the current 69kg world record held by China’s legendary Liao Hui.

Check out the video below.

Some have speculated about the possibility of the weights being fake, or miscounted, and we can’t definitively say one way or the other. Although, if you look closely, the bar oscillates pretty well, and if you count the plates, then they seem to add up to 200kg.

Also, if we account for the fact that more than likely, Jeong-Sik is sitting at a heavier weight compared to what he competes at, then we could probably see him pushing extra weight in training, but that will always be variable and subjective depending on the athlete.

At the 2017 IWF World Championships, Jeong-Sik took first for the 69kg weight class and concluded his clean & jerk performance with a second attempt 178kg (1st place). He missed his final attempt at 181kg. Check out his 2017 Worlds performance below.

Objectively speaking, all of Jeong-Sik’s clean & jerks looked relatively easy for him at Worlds. His elbows were the consistent cause for him being red lighted.

It’s tough to relate his World attempts to the 200kg clean & jerk above, yet we have seen Jeong-Sik hit 180kg+ with ease before, so it’s up to you to decide whether the 200kg video is real or not.

Feature image @shin_yong_jin_ Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.