Adidas appears to be joining the mix in the recent new training shoe releases.

They recently shared their new weightlifting shoe, the Leistung 16 II, but now they’ve posted two other shoes under their CrazyPower models.

Photo courtesy of shopboxbasics.com.

The first shoe is the Adidas CrazyPower TR, which is similar in name to the Reebok CrossFit Speed TR (a subsidiary of Adidas).

[Want to find the best weightlifting shoe for you? Read our full rundown of the best lifting shoes!]

This shoe is a cross trainer and has a very similar look to the Nike Metcon 3s.

Photo courtesy of shopboxbasics.com.

This shoe is currently available on pre-order at Box Basics for $119.95 and is set to ship by mid-January. Below is a list of the features posted on Box Basics website.

Photo courtesy of shopboxbasics.com. 

  • Textile and synthetic upper with RPU protective cage: Adds durability
  • Wider forefoot and raised toe cap: Provides extra stability, traction and allows your forefoot to splay naturally
  • Comfortable textile lining and low-profile cushioning with rubber cage: Provides additional comfort and support
  • PRO MODERATOR™ heel support: Stabilizes the heel
  • TRAXION™ outsole: Provides maximum grip in all directions
  • DROP: 3 mm
  • WEIGHT: 12.1 ounces

The other new model is the CrazyPower Weightlifting shoe. This shoe is currently available on an Adidas UK Specialty Sports site for 139.95 Euros or 145.60 USD.

Photo courtesy of adidasspecialtysports.co.uk. 

The black model looks similar to the new Reebok Legacy Lifter, minus the dual strap. Below is a list of this shoe’s features.

  • Mesh-sock upper with a mesh vamp overlay for maximum breathability
  • Lace-up construction with wide midfoot strap for extra support
  • Full sock-like lining for a tight, smooth fit
  • Flex grooves in forefoot for natural movement
  • TPU in heel for added support
  • Anatomically shaped outsole with anti-slip rubber material; Full length for consistent ground contact

The heel is made has a TPU insert, which is a lightweight durable thermoplastic polyurethane. This is the same type of heel a lot of Reebok lifting shoes utilize.

There’s a single strap and mesh throughout for breathability during workouts.

Photo courtesy of adidasspecialtysports.co.uk. 

It’s also important to point out that these lifters don’t have a tongue, which is different than your typical weightlifting shoe.

The sole of the shoe is completely flat to support full ground contact, and the heel looks to be a little pointed.

Photo courtesy of adidasspecialtysports.co.uk. 

These two new shoes under the CrazyPower model have multiple similarities to current shoes on the market (Nike Metcon 3s and Reebok Legacy Lifters). Some of this could be in relation to the fact that Reebok is a subsidiary of Adidas.

Feature image from adidasspecialtysports.co.uk.

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.