Kilo for Kilo: Weightlifters Are Some of the Strongest Athletes On Planet

There’s no denying that body type can play a monumental part in one’s success in strength sports. No matter the strength sport, there will always be a body type that responds better to certain activities, and this logic reigns especially true in the sport of weightlifting.

This isn’t to say that elite weightlifters are limited to certain anthropometrics, genetics, and dimensions, but there are a few truths between the world’s best and how they’re designed.

A few days ago, the Olympic YouTube channel published a video titled, “Anatomy Of A Weightlifter: What Are Dmytro Chumak’s Biggest Strengths?”. It was a really interesting video that covers one of Ukraine’s best weightlifters through a variety of tests and assessments. It reminds us a lot of the 3D Weightlifting Technology video we wrote on last year from the Olympic YouTube channel.

The first test they take Chumak through is a Bod Pod. This is one of the most accurate ways to assess body fat and lean muscle mass. In the video, when the researcher informs Chumak that he’s sitting at a very lean 9.5% body fat, he simply responds with, “Yes, not bad, I’m very happy.” 

To assess relative strength, the researchers used a Dynamometer grip test. In many research settings, scientists utilize a grip test to safely assess maximal strength, and we’ve actually written on this topic before.

Upon completion of the test, Chumak is told that his combined force production is 134kg, which is one the best scores he can produce for all sports, his weight, and maximal physical capabilities.

Image courtesy Olympic YouTube channel. 

The next tests, and possibly the most relevant for other weightlifters reading this now were the Isometric Thigh Pull Test, Isokinetic Dynamometer Test, and the Wingate Test. These tests are all designed to assess Chumak’s peak force production and anaerobic capabilities.

How did he perform compared to other weightlifters and top level athletes? Check the whole video out for his results!

Feature image from Olympic YouTube channel. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.