Brooke Ence Weighs In On Controversial Justice League Costumes

Hollywood continues to pump out the high demand superhero movies, and the latest block buster is set to drop tomorrow. DC Comics’ “Justice League” will be making a big screen appearance and features a ton of notable names. One of these names include CrossFit® athlete Brooke Ence, who made her first big screen appearance in Wonder Woman.

In the last few days, there’s been controversy behind the original Amazons’ costumes, and what’s being released in the latest movie. The criticism came in the form of tweets and on other media outlets pointing out that this year’s costumes were much more revealing than the original Amazon outfits.

Tweets similar to the one below began to flow in and spark the internet debate. Since the controversy began, actors such as Brooke Ence – who plays the Amazon Penthiselea – have weighed in on their opinions of the costumes, as they’re the ones actually wearing them.

Ence told USA Today that not every Amazon wore two pieces and said, “The girls on set, we never thought of (the new costumes) as a sexy version. It felt a little more glamorous, if anything, because we had bigger, beautiful hair, which I loved.”

She also added, “I’m an athlete first, right? (Usually) I can’t wear anything without someone commenting about my (muscular) body. So for me, it was actually really cool to be able to show it and not immediately feel masculine, but still very feminine.”

Then critics responded by pointing out the fact that the Amazons should need body armor. In which Ence reponded with, “That may be the case, but also we are super-powerful women and maybe no one’s getting that close. Maybe no one has a chance to get that close to hurt us.”

Another actress added to the above point by mentioning that Amazons fight in a very acrobatic way, so heavy or cumbersome armor could slow them down. Either way, Ence has made her thoughts clear.

Feature image from @brookeence Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.