Strongman Eddie Hall Maxes His One-Armed Human Press

Zydrunas Savickas gets a lot of press for his pressing, which is fair enough given that he still holds the world record in the log press with 228kg. But don’t sleep on Eddie Hall. The reigning World’s Strongest Man™ holds the axle press record with 216kg and he really put his muscular endurance on display yesterday when he hoisted a gymgoer over his head for fifteen reps.

[Want more? Watch Eddie Hall incline benching two guys, plus 9 more crazy impressive videos of humans lifting humans.]

Now, that dude does not look like he weighs 228 kilograms. But that’s still a pretty solid display of overhead strength, an area that he’s really been hammering lately. Two weeks ago, we saw him pull off a jaw-dropping forty-rep set of dumbbell overhead presses at 60 kilograms (132.2lb) per hand. Then, because that wasn’t quite enough, he went ahead and made a seated log press of 226 kilograms.

Eddie Hall is slated to compete in the log press at Europe’s Strongest Man this Saturday, April 7th, so you’d think he wouldn’t be doing max effort overhead presses in the days leading up to the event, but we’re not about to second guess the training methods of the World’s Strongest Man.

That said, Hall is only competing in the log press, so everything needs to be really dialed in. Unfortunately, he withdrew from competing in the rest of the events last week because he’s “99 percent sure” he tore ligaments in his ankle. (Tripping over a doormat, of all the ways to do it.)

But in his own words, he’s still coming for that log press record.

“I’ve always been very envious of Big Z for having that log press world record because it’s f*cking hard (…) I just need it. I need it in my life. I need it to sort of round up all these world records and world’s strongest man title to complete my package before I quit strongman, basically.”

Big Z, meanwhile, has said he’s aiming to lift 235 kilograms on Saturday and he’s already broken his record in training. This is going to be quite a fight.

Featured image via @eddiehallwsm on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.