Weightlifter Harrison Maurus’ 270kg Squat Is a Serious Nailbiter

A bearded Harrison Maurus recently uploaded a training clip that seemed intended to remind us what a squat max out really looks like. Under the bar: the 18-year-old holder of the -77kg youth world record (and senior American record) in the clean & jerk. On the bar: 270 kilograms, well over three times his bodyweight.

Watch it below.

Have you ever seen someone shake this much during a lift? And the guy absolutely nailed it.

He posted the squat with the following caption,

Legs were kind of tired from standing all day, but I still managed to get up to a 260 BS double and a single at 270. 5 under my best single.

With his legs being “kind of tired” we think it’s safe to say that squat scored 10 on his rate of perceived exertion (it’s over 98 percent of his all-time 1RM) although we think the video provides enough evidence of that!

This lift really demonstrated some serious stability on Maurus’ part. Let’s be honest, most people’s max (or max effort) squat wouldn’t even approach the depth that Maurus is displaying in this lift and despite the nailbiting shaking, he was still so stable as he came out of the hole.

[Is your squat lagging? Check out these 17 ways to fix a squat plateau!]

Heavy though it was, his PR in the lift (as stated above) is 275 kilos. Watch that below, or here for mobile users.

That lift was made at 83.2 kilos bodyweight this past April. With the advent of the IWF’s new weight classes, and for this year’s Weightlifting World Championships he’s listed as competing in the new -81kg instead of moving up to the new -89kg class. That may affect his strength — but we don’t think we’ve seen the last squat PR from him yet.

Featured image via Earth Fed Muscle on Facebook and @harrison_maurus on Instagram.

Nick English

Nick English

Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. At BarBend his writing more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.

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