Check Out Ian Wilson’s Latest 220kg/485 lb Jerk Off Blocks

American 105kg weightlifter Ian Wilson is coming back and in a big way. Late last week, we wrote about Wilson’s recent 285kg (628 lb) squat PR, and why it could mean big things for the US at this year’s IWF World Championships.

Wilson has built a strong weightlifting reputation for himself over the last decade. He was once the youngest American to clean & jerk 200kg (440 lbs) and is readying himself for the 105kg battle that’s going to be at Worlds in November. After taking a fair amount of time off to rehab nagging shoulder and knee injuries, Wilson is back and appearing stronger than ever.

Check out his latest 220kg (485 lb) jerk off blocks below.

Why is this lift so relevant? For starters, the current American record for the clean & jerk sits at 220kg. Obviously, this wasn’t the full lift, but Wilson’s proving that he can handle this weight overhead with relative ease. Additionally, Wilson hasn’t posted a true 1-RM clean & jerk video in quite some time, so it’s all up to speculation as to what he’ll be able to hit at Worlds.

As mentioned above, Wilson made the roster for USA Weightlifting’s team at this year’s IWF World Championships. He’ll be accompanying California Strength’s Wes Kitts in the 105kg men’s weight class. Check out Kitts’ 237kg jerk from back in March.

These two athletes both have the capability of possibly placing and breaking the 20 year World Championship medal drought for America’s male athletes, while possibly surpassing American records.

In our last article about Wilson, we asked him a few questions about his training and where he’ll be competing next. If you missed it, check out a couple of his answers below.

BarBend: What about your approach to training as far as volume and intensity? Has that changed?

Pretty similar, but I added a few push presses on off days to strengthen my shoulders.
But same training for the most part: 90%+ lifts multiple days per week.

BarBend: What’s the next meet you’re training for?

Caffeine & Kilos in a few weeks and then Worlds.

For the full interview, be sure to read out last article highlighting Wilson’s 285kg back squat.

Feature image screenshot from @iwilson1894 Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.