Anaheim to Host 2019 Youth World Weightlifting Championships

Yesterday, the IWF announced the locations for the 2019 Junior World Championships and Youth World Championships.

The IWF’s executive board recently met in Tokyo, Japan, where they unanimously decided the 2019 Junior World Championships hosting rights will go to the Fiji Weightlifting Association. They awarded the 2019 Youth World Championships hosting rights to USA Weightlifting, and the competition is now scheduled for Anaheim, California.

[Don’t miss out on the 2017 Junior World Championships, which run from June 15th-23rd. Check out this article on how to watch, who to look for, and full schedule.]

USA Weightlifting President Ursula Garza Papandrea said of the allocation, “In our aim to become a strong partner of the IWF we appreciate the trust they put in us to host another event.”

USA Weightlifting’s CEO Phil Andrews is working towards making Anaheim a consistent IWF hosting location. After Penang, Malaysia withdrew from hosting the 2017 IWF World Championships last October, the competition was re-allocated to the US, and the event will take place this November in Anaheim.

The 2019 Junior World Championships will be held in the city of Suva, which is the capitol of Fiji. The press release stated, “It is the first time since 1993 (Melbourne, AUS) that a country from the Oceania region will organize an IWF World Championships and first time ever in the Pacific region.”

Fiji may be small, but their weightlifting presence has grown in recent years. Last year, they hosted the Continental Qualification event for the Rio 2016 Olympics, and held multiple regional events.

[The 2018 Junior World Championships will be held in Pyongyang, North Korea, but USA Weightlifting is still unsure if they’ll be in attendance.]

There will be no 2018 Youth World Championships due to the Youth Olympics being held October 2018 in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Feature image from @iwfnet Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.