Watch KC Mitchell, the First Amputee to Complete a Full USPA Powerlifting Meet

There’s a good chance you’ve heard the name KC Mitchell or “That 1 Leg Monster” before, which is how he goes on social media. Mitchell is a military veteran who’s building his name and reputation as a powerlifter — with just one leg.

Mitchell recently made history on January 7th, 2017, as he became the first ever amputee to compete in a full powerlifting meet sanctioned by the USPA. He competed in the non-adaptive open division in the 110kg weight class.

His final successful lifts were a 435 lb squat, 424 lb bench, and 600 lb deadlift, which left him with an impressive 1,460 lb total.

The above video shows how passionate Mitchell is about his sport. Powerlifting hasn’t only driven and given him hope, but it’s inspired multiple athletes around the world (clearly evident by the fans). You can tell from the look in his eyes and his supportive group that powerlifting means more than moving weight to him.

When he was overseas in the military, Mitchell became severely injured after he was on patrol with his unit and they drove over an explosive device. His leg was so badly injured that Mitchell decided to go through with an amputation, as opposed to going through a long, possibly never-ending bout of physical therapy.

Personally, I think Mitchell is something very special for the world of strength. He’s pushing his body, spirit, and mind to the limits, while accomplishing feats that have never been done before.

The video below shared on the Strength Project’s YouTube Channel helps truly sum up Mitchell’s passion and ambition. It also provides insights into what happened to Mitchell’s leg and why he does what he does.

If you’re not feeling motivated or inspired after either of these videos, then I don’t know what it will take. I would almost guarantee your eyes will water up at least once during these videos. There’s something that rattles the soul when you realize how passionate someone is for something that’s so easily taken for granted (lifting with all our limbs).

Although, that’s the beautiful thing about strength. Everyone uses it for different reasons and everyone is chasing something that’s bigger than themselves.

Feature image from Apeman Strong YouTube page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.