Powerlifter Larry “Wheels” Williams Makes a Lifetime Deadlift PR With 900 Pounds

For most people, new personal records are a rare thing, the product of untold hours of patience, dedication, and hard work. A PR is a fleeting glimpse of improvement in weeks, months, or years of dreary lifting. This is rarely the case for novice lifters, of course, who often PR every other week, but for intermediate and especially advanced lifters, PRs are few and far between.

For most people, anyway.

For Larry Williams, better known as Larry Wheels, personal records fall a little more easily. One of the strongest bodybuilders (and people) on the planet, the guy hit a new record on April 5 with an 870-pound deadlift at 270 pounds bodyweight. That was a 15 pounds over his previous record.

It was pretty fast off the floor, sure, but with five weeks until his next meet we didn’t think we’d see another new record from him until he turned up at the 2018 Kern US Open on May 12th. 

[Read more: Larry Wheels Wins His First Bodybuilding Contest]

But this weekend, he hit a new PR, and he didn’t just add five or ten pounds to his deadlift. The man pulled a jaw dropping nine hundred pounds, thirty pounds heavier than his PR from just ten days earlier. (Though he used kilo plates for the 870 and pound plates for the 900, which may have offered a little more whip.) Take a look, and be warned: he celebrates with some pret-ty colorful language.

It’s interesting to note that his weight has remained the same for the last ten days, even though he has said that he wanted to bulk up into the 308-pound weight class so that he can take yet another record total. (He currently holds the total record in the 242lb class with 2,171 pounds and the 275lb record with 2,275lb.)

At this point it seems pretty unlikely he’ll add that much bulk in such a short time frame, but a better question is will he exceed the 308-pound total record anyway? It’s currently sitting at 2,369 pounds. We’re excited to see what he puts up come May 12.

Featured image via @larrywheels on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.