Have You Seen Korean Weightlifter Lee Sang’s Drop-and-Catch Lifting Videos?

Editors note: This article is intended to be satirical and light hearted for pure enjoyment. We’re not endorsing the performance of this movement, or activity in any form of your training, as it could lead to injury.

Very rarely does a new weightlifting technique arise that turns the heads of many. We’re in the midst of what could be the next secret to hitting and unlocking new PRs. It’s a technique that utilizes multiple aspects of successful Olympic movements including: Power, coordination, speed, strength, teammates, pure grit, and a lot of creativity.

Korean 69kg weightlifter Lee Sang has now shared two videos on his Instagram page that may provide the ticket to enhance your weightlifting. Sang’s two snatch and clean & jerk drop and catch videos are unique, fun, and entertaining.

Check out his latest video highlighting a ‘drop and catch’ snatch below.

Watch the flawless drop technique and transition under the bar. This athlete’s not only improving his power, but his speed and coordination as well. Maybe this method is how you can unlock that next milestone in your snatch.

But in all seriousness, we don’t recommend trying this, as there’s not always a clear way of gauging how a bar will bounce from overhead off a platform.

[Interested in more funny and unique weightlifting videos? Check out this compilation of some of Dmitry Klokov’s weightlifting antics.]

And as mentioned above, this drop and catch video isn’t the first one Sang has shared. A few weeks ago, he posted a video of a clean that’s spotted from the bottom, jerked, dropped, and then caught again to perform a power clean. It was definitely one of the most unique and funny weightlifting videos we’ve seen in quite some time.

Check out Sang’s hyped up clean & jerk, drop, and power clean video below.

These clips were definitely on the more… extreme side of weightlifting videos we’ve seen, but we’re not going to lie, they’re fun to watch. And to reiterate our point above, we don’t recommend trying either of these videos, or dropping a bar from overhead and trying to catch it.

Feature image screenshot from @lee_sang___ Instagram page. 

Comments

Previous articleSo You Wanna Be A Powerlifter? Registering for a Meet
Next articleThe Best Types of Conditioning Work for Weightlifters
Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.