Strongman Tom Stoltman Lifts 255kg Atlas Stone, Unofficially Breaks World Record

Consider the bar raised, or the Atlas Stone lifted in this case. If you felt the earth shift a little bit yesterday, have no fear, it was just professional strongman Tom Stoltman dropping a massive stone. Yesterday, from the comfort of his driveway, Stoltman casually hit an unofficial Atlas Stone world record with a massive 255kg (562 lb) stone lift.

Stoltman’s currently in prep for the Ultimate Strongman Team World Championship 2018 + U23 World Championship, which kicks off on August 26th in Stone-on-Trent, United Kingdom. Here, Stoltman and his brother Luke will face against five other two-man teams.

In Stoltman’s Instagram video’s description he writes, “Got the stone delivery today and wanted to give them a bash. Yeh it dosent mean anything in training etc but i managed to hit the 255kg atlas stone which has given me confidence for the teams! 

Thanks to @spartan_atlas_stones for making the stones and to all my sponsors and coaches for the work there putting in. Im working hard and I’ll keep working these last 3 weeks work is not done yet.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BmLcumUl95G/?taken-by=tomstoltman

The current official Atlas Stone world record is held by none other than legendary strongman Brian Shaw. At the 2017 Arnold Classic Rogue Record Breakers event he hoisted a massive 254kg (560 lb) stone titled the “Manhood Stone”. This 254kg record broke the previously held 2016 record by 5 lbs, which Shaw also held and set at the 2016 Arnold Classic.

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In order for an Atlas Stone world record to count in competition, it must be lifted over a 4-foot (1.22 meter) bar, which Stoltman easily does in his video above.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BRQ6pzjBBJo/?utm_source=ig_embed

The Atlas Stones are an event that clearly demonstrate the act of pure brute strength. Not many folks can pick up 500-lb stones casually and throw them over 4-foot bars, so we’re pumped to see if Stoltman can officially top the current world record in less than three weeks time.

Feature image from @tomstoltman Instagram page.