Learn What Drives CrossFit Games Champion Tia Toomey in this Short New Documentary

“I wanna get fit to be a better version of myself. And if i can be a better version of myself, I feel unstoppable and feel like I can go out and achieve whatever I want to achieve.”

With the 2018 Reebok CrossFit Games just weeks away, the organization’s media machine is running full steam but one of the most interesting videos we’ve seen lately isn’t a production from CrossFit HQ. This time, the independent Australian company The WOD Life flew to the small town of Gladstone on the coast of sunny Queensland, Australia, to get an inside look at the reigning Fittest Woman on Earth™, Tia-Clair Toomey.

While it hits all the beats of “Here’s why I do it” and “Here’s how I do it” there are some pretty inspiring points in this thirteen-minute documentary. Take a look.

Ever humble, this video reinforces the image that was crafted of Toomey in the documentary The Redeemed and the Dominant: not interested in being better than others, but being the best version of herself. Another important quote:

I want to be able to inspire everyone in the world to do exactly what I’ve done and go out after their dreams, because if i’ve done it, anyone can do it. They’ve just got to realize what they want to do and if they believe in themselves they can go out and do it themselves.

[Hungry for more documentaries on the sport’s top athletes? Check out the brand new series on Brent Fikowski.] 

You also get a few glimpses of her actual workouts, like an EMOM of 15 calorie ski and 15 overhead squats, or

4 Rounds
12xDB tricep extensions
8x Dead hang rope climb pull ups
30x GHD hip extensions (10/15kg)

One thing that’s really clear from the footage: Tia-Clair Toomey loves, loves, loves what she does. She doesn’t see it as something to suffer through, it’s something she enjoys every minute of. Maybe that’s the trick to becoming elite.

Featured image via TheWODLife on YouTube.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.