As the 2017 Reebok CrossFit Games approach, we haven’t just been enjoying the coverage from the Reebok CrossFit Games’ Update Studio, hours of behind-the-scenes footage, the occasional comedy sketch, and even some pretty cool short films submitted to their video contest; CrossFit HQ has also been pumping out some very high quality CrossFit® documentaries.

This week, they released a free, 40-minute documentary that provides an incredible opportunity to watch the sport’s greatest athletes train together, particularly the female athletes. In Road to the Games 17.02: Cookeville Camp we see Katrin Davidsdottir, Sara Sigmundsdottir, Tia-Clair Toomey, Camille LeBlanc-Bazinet, and more of CrossFit’s greats — including Rich Froning — train together at CrossFit Mayhem as they tackle 17.2, the second workout of the CrossFit Open.

Image via CrossFit® on YouTube

It’s a lot of fun to see even the world’s best athletes talking about how much they themselves dread the CrossFit workouts. “Do the workout, they said,” says Froning in a mocking voice. “It’ll be fun, they said.”

We’ve got to say, one of the most entertaining aspects of the video is watching a gym full of some of the world’s most competitive athletes try to balance camaraderie and inclusiveness with their intense drive to be the best at their sport. The friendly-but-maybe-it’s-not-that-friendly trash talk between the athletes, particularly from Camille LeBlanc-Bazinet and Nick Paladino, is worth the click.

Afterwards, the CrossFit Mayhem team heads to Rich Froning’s place to attend Cookeville Camp, a grueling event that features a training seminar on aerobic capacity from running guru Chris Hinshaw (it’s a lot of fun to see all the top athletes fail at single unders) and a brutal teamwork exercise from Major Brian Chontosh, a CrossFit athlete and retired Marine. Chontosh’s drills take place in the middle of the forest and last all night, and the athletes are punished multiple times for failing to pass tasks.

You’ve seen CrossFit athletes in pain before, but not like this. Check it out.

Featured image via CrossFit® on YouTube.

Comments

Previous articleImportant: There’s an Instagram of People Snatching Snack Food
Next articleCable Pull Through Alternatives for Strength and Coordination
Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.