New to the Movement, Larry Wheels Hits a 500lb Snatch Grip Push Press

Larry Williams, better known to the strength community as Larry Wheels, is an enormously successful powerlifter and bodybuilder who has achieved world record totals in the 242 pound class (2,171) and the 275 pound class (2,291lb). With almost 750,000 Instagram followers, he’s also managed to parlay his athleticism into becoming something of a social media celebrity, so really, it was just a matter of time before he crossed paths with Bradley Martyn.

Martyn (who totals about 3 million Instagram followers) owns the Los Angeles gym Zoo Culture and in his early days was a physique athlete and Olympic weightlifter. In a clip he just posted, Wheels was working out at Zoo Culture when he decided to try his luck at a behind the neck snatch grip push press, which he says was his “first time doing this, super fun movement!”

So of course whatever he lifted was going to be a personal record. But the guy pulled off a lift of 500 pounds, more than the lifetime best would be for many career weightlifters.

Take a look below.

If you’re curious as to the benefits of this lift, check out our full article that breaks it down: It works the traps, the entire shoulder, the lats, quads, glutes, and core. You can say the same for the regular push press or the behind the neck push press, but this variation has a bit more carryover to the full snatch and can be more helpful for addding more volume to training sessions.

[Read more: the 5 heaviest barbell push presses we’ve ever seen]

 While he was at Zoo Culture this week, Williams also did a pretty remarkable squat pyramid that took him up to 775 pounds, then back down again.

I’d say “that man’s going to be hurting tomorrow” but it seems pretty clear that Wheels’ body doesn’t obey conventional rules. In any case, we’re looking forward to his next training clip.

Featured image via @larrywheels on Instagram.

Nick English

Nick English

Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.

After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.

No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?

Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.

At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.

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