With more than 2 million Instagram followers, 2.5 million Facebook likes, and 840,000 YouTube subscribers, Bradley Martyn is one of the better known fitness celebrities on the web and to many, that’s all he is: a famously pretty body.

At 6’3”, 260 pounds and single-digit body fat, he’s earned a devoted following among bodybuilders. But in a new video, Martyn is showing that he’s surprisingly adept at Olympic weightlifting. Take a look at the man completing two sets of cleans at 315 pounds below.

Given his significant bench press (well over 400 pounds) and all the bodybuilding workouts he enjoys, he actually has an incredibly good front rack position, but that makes sense.

Despite his popular image as a bodybuilder and front squat aficionado, Martyn started out as a weightlifter before diving into bodybuilding. Below, you can watch another of his videos in which he cleans and overhead squats 315 pounds in separate sets.

In an interview with RX Muscle from way back in 2011, Martyn said that Olympic weightlifting was his favorite form of physical exercise, but his favorite aspect of fitness is, “changing one’s body into something that has been envisioned and created in the mind overtime and with the right encouragement!”

While these videos show some serious strength and dedication, Bradley is better-known for his cheeky sense of humor and some of his more jaw-dropping social media posts. Here are a couple of our favorites.

Holding a heavy pull during a mannequin challenge

A no-hands walk and back squat

Squatting while supporting two ladies… on top of a hoverboard

Featured image via Bradley Martyn on YouTube

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.