These Are 32 Things Strong Women Do Not Want to Hear On Dates

Let’s set the scene.

You have a date coming up with a super cool lady, and you find out soon after she’s really into lifting. Now you’re no stranger to the gym, but you’re not heavily involved in strength sports such as powerlifting, weightlifting, CrossFit, strongman, or bodybuilding, which she is, so you begin to wonder, “Is there anything I should avoid saying on our date?”.

For context, we recently wrote about the seven things not to say to 2-Time CrossFit Games Champion Katrin Davidsdottir on a date, which is what inspired this article. Her video got us thinking, what else shouldn’t you say to female strength athletes on a date?

We reached out to athletes in multiple strength sports, and here’s what they had to say.

Daniella Melo – Powerlifter

“I wouldn’t date a girl who’s stronger than me.”

Tiffany Nguyen – Powerlifter

“What makes you want to be strong?”

“You don’t think you’re more masculine than other women?”

“Why would you want to lift that much weight?”

Sheri Miles – Powerlifter

“I wear gloves in the gym to keep my hands soft.”

“Can I try some of your food? Let’s share dessert.”

Stefi Cohen – Powerlifter/Weightlifter

“Wow you eat a lot.”

“You’re pretty muscular, for a girl.”

“You do powerlifting, isn’t that a men’s sport?”

Jordan Weichers – Weightlifter

“Those jeans make you look skinny.”

“Are you going to eat ALL of that?”

“Flex for me. We need to see who has bigger biceps.”

Amber Abweh – Powerlifter

“Do you ever arm wrestle?”

“So do you eat a lot of protein?”

Alex Silver-Fagan – Strength Coach

“Aren’t you afraid of getting bulky?”

Aysha Haley – Powerlifter

“So can you like deadlift me?”

“How many inches around are your thighs?”

[Read: Female powerlifters share the weirdest comments guys say to them!] 

Meghan Scanlon – Powerlifter

“How much do you lift? Okay, and how much do you weigh?”

“In high school I squatted 400 lbs.”

Sarah Brenner – Powerlifter

“I bet you could lift me.”

Kristen Dunsmore – Powerlifter

“Are you going to eat all of that?”

Maddy Forberg – Powerlifter

“Shouldn’t you be watching what you eat?”

“Do you think your legs could crush me?”

“Are you really going to eat all of that?”

Stacia-Al Mahoe – Powerlifter/Weightlifter

“You have rough hands.”

“Aren’t you afraid you’ll look like a man.”

“Your traps are too big.”

Bonica Brown – Powerlifter

“Why do you like to lift so heavy?”

“Can you help me with my squat technique? Maybe a program?”

Emily Hu – Powerlifter

“Wow your arms are big! Wanna arm wrestle?”

Chelsea Potter – Strength Coach

“Oh you wouldn’t like that, it’s not healthy.”

Wrapping Up

To be honest, some of the above quotes should come as a no brainer, but for someone not involved in strength sports, it may not be so obvious. Advice going forward: if you find yourself on a date with a woman who’s involved in strength sports, then think about what you say and how it could be taken before doing so.

Editors note: This article is an op-ed. The views expressed herein and in the video are the authors and don’t necessarily reflect the views of BarBend. Claims, assertions, opinions, and quotes have been sourced exclusively by the author.

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.