10 CrossFit Women Who Inspired Us In 2019

Though it’s hard to pick just 10, here’s our list of inspiring CrossFit women.

While it goes without saying that three-time CrossFit Games champion Tia-Clair Toomey and the Icelandic Dottirs have been inspiring CrossFit fans with their brilliant performances for years, there are so many other equally inspiring CrossFit women out there—women who inspire beyond their competition performances.

There are so many ways I could have gone with this list, but I went the route of 10 women who have exposed their true personalities—who have opened up vulnerably, expressed insecurities and broken down—and have made me laugh and made me cry. 

(In no particular order):

1. Cassidy Lance-McWherter

This five-time CrossFit Games athlete has moved away from high-level CrossFit competition and has embarked on a path of trying to become pregnant and start a family with her female partner. She has been incredibly brave and open about her struggles to start a family. 

On September 10, 2019, Lance-McWherter posted this video on Instagram, where she shared her emotions after another negative pregnancy test.

“This time was the absolute worst. It hit me the hardest. I think because I was soooo hopeful this time and I really felt like it would take,” she wrote in the post.

As gut-wrenching as her post was, it’s also a breath of fresh air to watch something so authentic and real.

2. Alex Parker

This 2015 CrossFit Games athlete might just be the most entertaining and witty competitor out there. Her social media posts will make you laugh. Period.

But she’s more than just an entertainer. She’s also super honest in her posts about topics most people would shy away from confronting. The best example I can remember was when her partner Meredith Root qualified to the CrossFit Games and she didn’t. Most athletes would likely just pretend to be happy for their partner, Parker admitted that, although happy for Root, it was incredibly difficult for her.

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A lot of people asked me this weekend how it was competing against @meredith_root. It was a great experience, however, it was very emotionally challenging. I’ll try to explain why, and I will be honest. I am so incredibly competitive in literally everything I do, that I actually annoy myself. And for some reason, I hate when Meredith beats me more than when anyone else does. I get temporarily, insanely and selfishly jealous when she wins, no matter what the competition is. It just doesn’t feel right to feel this way towards someone I am dating. That is what’s hard about it. Luckily we are open with each other about these feelings. Having said that, I also love to see her succeed, even when it’s at my expense. It’s a frustrating mix of emotions that I really struggle to manage, but being in a relationship with someone who also is competitive has several advantages. I have someone who experiences the similar ups and downs that come with the territory, eats the same food, and understands when I spend all my free time in the gym. And because she is someone I train with, training quality is much higher. Accordingly, our coach only programs 1v1 workouts a couple of times a week so we don’t kill each other. It’s an extra benefit when that person is someone that ‘gets’ you (and is a much better cook than you!). It goes without saying that I would not have done as well as I did this weekend without her. She not only supported me through the weekend, but through the whole year. Not to mention, she has, and continues to, help me survive my demanding and time consuming job. Okay, okay, I’ll admit it – she treats me like a princess. It’s also difficult because I’m not used to being emotionally invested in someone else’s success. When they fail, you feel it. In this moment, she is upset with falling short of her goal, and I felt it like it was me . . . But I still hate that she beat me. Like I said, it’s a mix of emotions. As hard as a relationship can be at times, it seems to be worth the struggles. I’m pretty darn lucky. We are both stronger individually from this weekend and even stronger together. I’m already excited for next year. @crossfitgames #regionals2018 #proud

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“I hate when Meredith beats me more than when anyone else does. I get temporarily, insanely and selfishly jealous when she wins, no matter what the competition is,” Parker wrote. “It’s a frustrating mix of emotions that I really struggle to manage.”

Though some might fear admitting this type of emotion to the world would make them less likable, it only made Parker more relatable.

3. Kara Saunders

I know I said this wouldn’t be performance-based inspiration, per se, but I absolutely cannot leave this seven-time CrossFit Games athlete off the list. After taking a year off competing to give birth to her first child, Saunders appears to be 100 percent back to her former fitness level and recently placed 12th in the CrossFit Open, unofficially qualifying to this summer’s CrossFit Games. 

Through her endearing social media posts, where she takes her baby swimming, it’s easy to see Saunders is as passionate about being a mother as she is an athlete. 

4. Camille Leblanc-Bazinet

After competing at the CrossFit Games as an individual every single year from 2010 to 2018, Leblanc-Bazinet competed on a team at the Games for the first time last year. After 10 consecutive CrossFit Games appearances, Leblanc-Bazinet is not competing this year.

Moving away from competition can be incredibly hard emotionally for any high level athlete, and what has made Leblanc-Bazinet so inspiring to me this year is how she seems to be redefining what fitness is for her now (it’s unclear if she has fully retired or is just taking a year off). 

Through the months, she has been sharing about how she has embraced more traditional bodybuilding-type training. It’s reassuring to know that when you leave something behind, there are many new doors that open and can be as fulfilling as what you left behind.

5. Michele Letendre

Michele Letendre’s story is similar to Leblanc-Bazinet’s. After competing at the CrossFit Games five times, Letendre stepped away from competition in 2017 and has quickly turned herself into a world-renowned CrossFit coach—possibly the most underrated coach out there.  Last year, Letendre coached four CrossFit Games athletes, including Patrick Vellner, Laura Horvath, James Newbury, and Samuel Cournoyer. 

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Today I was thinking a lot about the different roles I’ve had in my life. This morning I was on my way to the @dekacrossfit and I was going to fix a broken audio wire. I was thinking to myself: “man it’s a good thing I played with electronics at school because otherwise, I’d have to get someone else to do this simple job”. . . That made me realize that I’ve done a lot of different things throughout my life. I’ve scooped ice cream, drawn, painted, sculpted… I’ve worked as a hotel receptionist, I’ve lead design projects with school, I’ve worked with LEDs, sensors and even a 3D printer… I’ve sold insurance…I’ve played waterpolo and competed in CrossFit, then in weightlifting. I’ve coached CrossFit in gyms and now in competition. I’m newly a gym owner and an owner of @dekacomp . I’m only 33 years old. I feel very fortunate to have this much experience at my age and I can’t wait to learn more. . I was speaking with my mother not long ago about leadership and gym ownership, she offered her help and it seemed so simple and effective. She said to me, Michele, I’ve been doing this for 30 years, and only have I really put things together in the last 5. That got me excited… to know that I can only get better and more concise with my message to the world through time and experience I felt a surge of confidence that through my continued exposure to the world and the multiple roles I will take on, i will end up with a solid and meaningful contribution. . . . What have your experiences been? How many roles have you played so far and how do you feel they connect? Let’s hear it!

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More than anything, though, having met Letendre numerous times, I can say with certainty this woman is genuine as they come

6. Haley Adams

The older generation in society always like to rag on the younger generation. These days, I often hear adults talking about the poor work ethic of teenagers today, or that they spend too much time on their phones, and definitely that they’re entitled.

Adams, however, is proof there are some seriously hard workers under the age of 20. 

She’s only 19 and she has already competed at four CrossFit Games—three times in the teenager division—and she placed sixth last summer in her rookie year in the women’s division. And it’s clear she has only continued to grow in 2019. There couldn’t be a better role model for young up-and-comers than this teenager. 

7. Annie Thorisdottir

I couldn’t leave this woman off the list. She has been competing at the CrossFit Games since 2009. In fact, Thorisdottir has only missed one CrossFit Games in the last decade — 2013 — because of an injury.

And just when we thought she might be starting to fade when she placed 38th in 2015 and 13th in 2016, she came back in 2017 and placed 3rd. Considering Thorisdottir just placed 2nd in the CrossFit Open, it’s safe to say she isn’t fading yet. Her staying power is absolutely inspiring. 

8. Regan Huckaby

This three-time CrossFit Games athlete is proof you can do it all. She has managed to continue to become fitter and fitter each year — Huckaby placed 3rd at Games with her Invictus team last summer summer — all the while prioritizing the trials and tribulations of motherhood. There’s a sincerity to Huckaby’s voice on her social media posts that melts your heart.

9. Samantha Briggs

This list wouldn’t be complete without this six-time individual CrossFit Games athlete, who also competed in the Women’s 35-39 division at the 2018 CrossFit Games. Like Thorisdottir, Briggs’ ability to remain competitive year after year is incredible. 

But what I love most about her is how she doesn’t try to be anything she isn’t, and through all her success over the years, she remains humble and down to earth.

10. Lauren Fisher

What I love most about this four-time individual and two-time team CrossFit Games athlete is her willingness to be courageous and address hard issues. Though Fisher is obviously incredibly lean, she doesn’t necessarily have the rippling eight-pack abs many of her competitors possess. And believe it or not, online bullies have brought this to her attention.

On April 20th, Fisher addressed them head on:

“How come you exercise so hard and don’t have a flat belly?” asked the bullies.

“I don’t have a flat belly because I believe in fueling my body for performance over restricting my calories to look a certain way. Yeah, if I starved myself or cut down my fats and still trained as much as I do I might finally get that 8 pack but reality is my body type won’t. I like to eat and I know when I don’t eat enough I just don’t feel good during training. And a lot of it also comes down to genetics. So I’m sorry but I will never be one of the girls with no belly fat at all and I’m okay with it,” she wrote.

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How come you exercise so hard and don’t have a flat belly?! I shared my answer to this on my story but it was too important to not post about it as well. 😤 It got me a little fired up and I feel like it’s a topic that needs to be talked about more. 👊 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ “I don’t have a flat belly because I believe in fueling my body for performance over restricting my calories to look a certain way. Yeah if I starved myself or cut down my fats and still trained as much as I do I might finally get that 8 pack but reality is my body type won’t. I like to eat and I know when I don’t eat enough I just don’t feel good during training. And a lot of it also comes down to genetics. So I’m sorry but I will never be one of the girls with no belly fat at all and I’m okay with it. I’m not an Instagram model, I’m an athlete and what we do is completely different here so if you don’t like the way I look you can unfollow. ☺️ Thank you!” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #GROWNSTRONG #StrongIsIn ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ PS. This is me no makeup, hair not done, just got done with training. I eat around 3000 calories a day and I feel HAPPY and HEALTHY in my body. Yeah some of my pictures on Instagram don’t look attractive or my muscles might be bulging because usually a photographer comes in the middle of my training session. I’m not posing for the camera or starving myself before so my abs will pop through. I’m trying to be the best me and if I get a cool picture in action I’m going to share it. ✌️BE REAL, BE TRUE, BE YOU. ❤️ That is all. Thank you to everyone who shared or wrote me a kind message after I posted my story. Love you all. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ XO LF

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Amen, sister.

Featured image: @mich_letendre on Instagram

Emily Beers

Emily Beers

Emily Beers is a freelance health, fitness and nutrition writer. She has also been coaching fitness at MadLab School of Fitness in Vancouver, B.C. since 2009. A former college basketball player and rower, Emily became heavily involved in CrossFit after finishing her Masters degree in journalism at the University of Western Ontario. She competed at the 2014 CrossFit Games and also worked with CrossFit Inc.’s media team for 8 years. You can also find her work at Precision Nutrition, the Whole Life Challenge, OPEX, and a host of other fitness and nutrition companies and media outlets.

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