Josh Bridges Does “Murph” On the Great Wall of China

If there’s one thing CrossFit® athletes do when they’re overseas, it’s work out on or near famous monuments.

Longtime Reebok CrossFit Games athlete Josh Bridges is enjoying a vacation in China, but that doesn’t mean he’s taking time off from fitness. Take a look at the clip below of Bridges mid-Murph on the Great Wall of China somewhere outside of Beijing.

Murph, for those not in the know, is one of CrossFit’s most grueling workouts: a 1-mile run, 100 pull-ups, 200 push-ups, 300 air squats, and another 1-mile run. It’s often performed in a weighted vest.

[Do you have trouble staying fit when you travel? Here’s how some CrossFit athletes work out in hotel gyms!]

It would be pretty hilarious if Bridges went to the trouble of bringing a weighted vest to China, though we’re pretty sure he picked up at Beijing’s CrossFit Slash, a gym that seems to have a habit of performing Murph on the Great Wall.

Our initial reactions to this video were number one: where did he find a place to do pull-ups? And number two: where did he find a runnable stretch of the Great Wall that wasn’t clogged with tourists?

[Bridges recently made headlines pushing a 1,000-pound sled — check it out here!]

Bridges, who placed second in the 2011 CrossFit Games, also hit up another favorite tourist spot in China: the Terracotta Warriors in Xi’an. A two hour flight west of Beijing, these the soldiers are over two thousand years old but were only just discovered in 1974 when a group of local farmers were digging a well.

The trip started us thinking about the most unusual Murphs we’ve ever seen. We decided it was a toss-up between this 59-year-old who performed the workout for twenty-four hours straight…

… the pack of CrossFitters who did Murph right after skydiving out of a plane…

… or the astronaut we interviewed who did Murph on specialized resistance devices in space. (This is a video showing how he completed Angie, a workout that also involves pull-ups, push-ups, and squats)

What’s your favorite?

Featured image via @bridgesj3 on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.