Weightlifter Oleg Slobodyanyuk’s Huge 300kg Front Squat Was Crazy Fast

The first thing we said when we saw this video was, “Wait, what?”

This is one of the heaviest beltless front squats we’ve ever seen and certainly the heaviest we’ve seen lately. Ukrainian weightlifter Oleg Slobodyanyuk’s lift below is so smooth it practically looks like he’s doing a bodyweight squat. Take a look at the front squat that’s tearing up the internet.

[Is your front squat lagging a little? Here are two tools that can take it to new heights.]

He posted this with a pretty simple comment:

Front squatting. 300 kg, weighing 155kg, 29 years old

So the guy weighs over 340 pounds. But that’s a front squat of 300 kilograms (661.4 pounds). And he’s not wearing a belt. Front squats are seriously taxing on the core and to take this much weight for such a smooth ride without a belt… let’s just say there’s an argument to be made that in some ways, it’s more impressive than a heavier back squat.

Speaking of back squats, the superheavyweight also posted a pretty rough five-rep set of 280 kilograms (617.3 pounds) earlier this year, but we wanted to highlight some of Slobodyanyuk’s Olympic weightlifting. He’s posted some nice clips that include a 215-kilogram clean & jerk…

Plus this 170-kilogram snatch.

But those clips are good two years old. The guy doesn’t post much and frankly, we know next to nothing about him.

What this clip did do was make a lot of people ask: is that one of the greatest front squats of all time? Well, it is beltless, but there have been a lot of other squats that are more likely to go down in the history books. Thus far the absolute heaviest that we’ve seen came from Nauru’s Jezza Uepa, who is responsible for the only front squats over 400 kilograms caught on film. Here’s 405kg (893 pounds), which he made in Brisbane last year.

[Check out Uepa’s 455kg back squat that was, at the time, a new world record.]

Relative to bodyweight, though, we might have to give the best front squat award to Bulgara’s Ivan Ivanov, who made a 210-kilogram (463-pound) lift somewhere around 56 kilograms bodyweight. This is probably the closest to a quadruple bodyweight front squat that we’ve seen.

Anyway, front squats are awesome and we hope to see more from Oleg Slobodyanyuk in the future. The kid’s got heart. And quads. Lots of quads.

Featured image via @olejuk_telejuk on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.