Larry Wheels Deadlifts an Insane 855 lb Triple

It might be safe to say that Larry Wheels and his lifting don’t really apply to traditional thoughts on training. Wheels is linearly progressing, but at a rate that continues to leave many fans and spectators scratching their heads. How can someone at such an elite level still progress as if he just started lifting?

We’re not completely sure how to answer that question, but we’re happy we get to witness Wheels continue to push the envelope of what’s humanly possible. Could Wheels be ushering in a new era of strength athletes?

From his latest videos, it appears as though Wheels is in California visiting Bradley Martyn’s gym Zoo Culture. We can only imagine the synergistic energy that these two athletes are most likely bringing to every training session, and maybe that explains Wheels’ latest string of PRs. In his latest video, Wheels smokes a deadlift triple PR with an incredible weight of 387kg/855 lbs, and looked like he wanted a fourth before stopping the set.

Back in late September, we wrote about one of Wheels’ deadlift PR singles and that was a strong 381kg/840 lbs. Since, we’ve covered some of Wheels’ biggest deadlifts like this 394kg/870 lb pull and this lifetime 408kg/900 lb deadlift. In our opinion, it’s only a matter of time until Wheels is pulling 400kg/880 lbs for a triple.

[Watch Wheels squat 700 lbs, bench press 585 lbs, and deadlift 800 lbs all for triple in the span of 36-minutes!]

Outside of his monster deadlift triple, Wheels also hit a bench press AMRAP PR at Zoo Culture. Four days ago, Wheels shared a bench press video that has once again left the internet shook at his work capacity. Check out his latest 227kg/500 lb set of 11 below.

It’s always exciting to watch Wheels deadlift new PRs because he’s getting scary close to nearing the 900 lb (routinely) and 1,000 lb milestones. What weight will his next 1-RM video feature? We’ll have to wait to find out.

Feature image from @larrywheels Instagram page. 

Comments

Previous articleShould You Squat or Deadlift First?
Next articleBest Weightlifting Shoes for Flat Feet
Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.