How Fast Can Strongman Brian Shaw Eat a 7-Pound Burrito?

His Instagram may not be quite as popular as one-time World’s Strongest Man winner Hafthor Bjornsson, but four-time World’s Strongest Man Brian Shaw has his YouTube game on point.

His channel Shaw Strength has a solid 150,000 subscribers and he puts up new videos every week documenting the ins and outs of being an extremely large and incredibly strong person.

Training videos are cool, but one of the components of the strongman puzzle that continually blows us away is the sheer volume of food they eat, and Brian Shaw just uploaded a video of an eating challenge that we didn’t doubt he could win.

(That’s just the preview.)

At Big City Burrito in Fort Collins, Colorado, there’s a burrito called the Gut Buster. It has two tortillas, cheese, rice, beans, meat, vegetables, potato, guacamole, sour cream, and queso. It weighs seven pounds. It is usually purchased to feed a family. How did Brian Shaw fare with it? Here’s the full clip.

He ate it, Brian Shaw ate it. On the video it took about 5 minutes in fast forward, so maybe that was 10 or 15 minutes overall? It was his first cheat meal in months and in the hands of a six-foot-eight, 400-ish-pound man, it looked like a regular sized burrito.

“I’m gonna have to use a different toilet,” he concluded. “My wife is gonna get too mad. I’ve preplanned that out.”

[Learn how Brian Shaw navigates life as a giant person (like custom cutlery) in this video.]

While it’s pretty impressive as far as an individual meal goes, it’s even more amazing to watch the guy on an average grocery run. Earlier this year he showed his viewers a Costco trip where he revealed that he eats six pounds of meat every day. (He grinds the meat to make burgers so it’s not so much work to chew.)

But perhaps the most popular thing we’ve posted about the guy (besides competition results) is a full day of eating… 12,000 calories. Relive the magic below.

Brian Shaw eats a lot of food.

Featured image via @shawstrength on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of things.After Shanghai, he went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before finishing his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and heading to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like BarBend, Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.No fan of writing in the third person, Nick’s passion for health stems from an interest in self improvement: How do we reach our potential?Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.