15 Year Old Powerlifter Max Shethar Squats a Massive 260kg (575 lb) PR

What were you doing when you were 15 years old?

I’d guess you were playing a sport(s) and most likely lifting  maybe not seriously lifting with a strength sport in mind  but lifting nonetheless. And that lifting brings us to the athlete we’re highlighting in this article, Max Shethar. This athlete is one year shy of obtaining his drivers license (in most states) and is hitting numbers a lot of athletes strive for most of their careers.

Over the last three days, Shethar, a -120kg powerlifting athlete, has shared three videos on his Instagram page highlighting personal records in the squat, bench press, and deadlift. The lifts are insanely strong, and please keep in mind, he’s only 15 years old.

The first video he shared comes from three days ago when Shethar squatted a strong 260kg (575 lb) PR. He writes in his description that this was a 70 lb since his last training cycle and his bodyweight is ~266 lbs.

Besides the lift looking pretty smooth throughout the whole movement, a 70 lb PR over his last training cycle is nuts.

This lift was impressive, but the videos aren’t done there. In the video below, Shethar hits a 156kg (345 lb) bench press with a decent pause, which he points and acknowledges in his description isn’t a full competition pause.

A 260kg (575 lb) squat and a 156kg (345 lb) bench press, but what about his deadlift?

Don’t worry, you’re not going to be disappointed because Shethar is proving once again that he’s a well-rounded athlete. Yesterday, he shared his final video from his strew of gym PRs and it’s a 265kg (585 lb) deadlift, which cumulatively earns him a strong 682kg (1,505 lb) gym total.

Yes, these are all gym PRs, but Shethar has demonstrated he can compete as well. Back in mid-February Shethar competed and totaled 630kg (1,389 lbs), and hit a 230kg (507 lb) squat, a 145kg (319 lb) bench press, and 255kg (562 lb) deadlift.

The future is looking bright for this young athlete, we’re pumped to see what the future holds for him.

Feature image from @the_one_rep_max Instagram page. 

Comments

Previous articleUpper Body Dynamic Warm Up – Training Benefits and Sample Routine
Next articleWhat Are Your Thoughts On These Two World Record Deadlifts?
Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.