19.2 CrossFit® Open Workout Tips from Top Athletes and Coaches

Check out these Open Workout 19.2 tips from top coaches and athletes.

Athletes and fans thought CrossFit Open Workout 19.1 was tough, but Open Workout 19.2 may have taken the cake by a long shot. This workout is a multi-round time-based workout featuring three movements, and is a repeat from 2016’s epic Open Workout 16.2. The great thing about a repeat in the Open is now multiple CrossFit athletes and coaches have had two chances to perform this workout and share their best Open Workout 19.2 tips.

In case you missed the announcement, then check the Open Workout 19.2 announcement article. We’ve also included the full workout and the workout’s movement standards below.

CrossFit Open Workout 19.2

Score: Total number of repetitions completed in the time period given. 

Round 1

  • 25 toes-to-bar, 50 double-unders, 15 squat cleans with 135 lbs for men / 85 lbs for women

Round 2

  • 25 toes-to-bar, 50 double-unders, and 13 squat cleans with 185 lbs for men / 115 lbs for women

If you complete two rounds in 8 minutes, then add four minutes of additional time. 

Round 3

  • 25 toes-to-bar, 50 double-unders, and 11 squat cleans with 225 lbs for men / 145 lbs for women

If you complete three rounds in 12 minutes, then add four minutes of additional time.  

Round 4

  • 25 toes-to-bar, 50 double-unders, and 9 squat cleans with 275 lbs for men / 175 lbs for women  

If you complete four rounds in 16 minutes, then add four minutes of additional time. 

Round 5

  • 25 toes-to-bar, 50 double-unders, and 7 squat cleans with 315 lbs for men / 205 lbs for women

Timecap: 20-minutes

CrossFit Open Workout 19.2 Movement Standards

Toes-To-Bar

For a toes-to-bar rep to count, an athlete must begin in a fully extended position with their feet behind the bar, then lift their legs to the bar with both feet making contact. The feet must make contact with the bar within the hands of the athlete.

Double-Unders

A double-under rep is counted when the rope passes underneath the athlete’s feet twice for one jump.

Squat Clean

The barbell must start on the ground and touch-and-go is permitted, but bouncing and letting go, then grabbing the bar is not. When catching the bar, the athlete’s hips must pass below the knees for the rep to count. An athlete is allowed to catch this clean in a power position, then front squat after to make the rep count. A rep is completed when the athlete’s knees and hips are extended in the standing position and the barbell is settled on the shoulders.

Top CrossFit Open Workout 19.2 Tips

This workout is great because elite athletes and coaches have had multiple exposures to the stress this workout can cause. Check out our favorite four Open Workout 19.2 tips below!

1. Cole Sager — Warm-Up Is Key

Cole Sager spends a lot of time in his video breaking down the importance of the warm-up for Open Workout 19.2. He provides a lot of rationale and great movement examples to get every athlete primed and ready to take on the workout.

2. Trifecta/Rich Froning — Break It Up and Be Patient

Rich Froning teamed up with Trifecta Nutrition to provide tips for tackling Workout 19.2. Froning dives into the logistics of performing each round’s sets and recommends breaking up the toes-to-bar early on and remaining patient with the double-unders.

3. Craig Richey — Breathe

Similar to what Froning said, CrossFit athlete and YouTuber Craig Richey recommending breaking up toes-to-bar early on by performing a few reps, coming down and taking a few seconds, then jumping back up. Richey also pointed out the importance of breathing during the double-unders.

4. Brute Strength — Strategize Your Warm-Ups

The coaches at Brute Strength recommend warming-up in a couple strategic ways by spending more time on movements you struggle with in the warm-up, and by limiting how heavy athlete works up to in the squat clean (75% should be heavy enough for many). 

Feature image from CrossFit YouTube channel. 

Jake Boly

Jake Boly

Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as the Fitness and Training Editor at BarBend.

He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand.

As of right now, Jake has published over 1,200 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter.

On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.

Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and a personal trainer the three years before that, and most recently he was the content writer at The Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office.

Jake competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a professional knee rehabber after tearing his quad squatting in 2017. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in New York City.

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