Jason Khalipa knows the power of persistence; after all, it takes an incredible amount of daily work and motivation to stay at the top of the competitive CrossFit world for seven years. Now, with his attention focused more on business growth and his daughter Ava’s battle with juvenile leukemia, Khalipa is still giving back to the fitness community in an incredibly simple, effective way: A daily EMOM.

Khalipa’s new Instagram account, called “Every Minute on the Minute” or @emomoftheday, is exactly what it sounds like. Every day, Khalipa posts a new workout, the structure of which calls for a movement or movements to be performed at the top of every minute, either for a set period of time or for as long as the exerciser can maintain a certain rep range.

They’re often simple but deceptively brutal workouts, and the EMOM that started it all is a perfect example.

In Khalipa’s own words:

Started an Instagram called @emomoftheday. For years I have trained EMOM’s as a primary tool to develop capacity and evaluate my technique. Generally when you finish a workout it’s the time you evaluate. With an EMOM or interval workouts you can evaluate each time there is a short break. How is my technique? Am I performing at my best effort etc. Also a great way to get a push by competing against the clock. This is not intended as a program to get you to the Games. It’s a fun daily EMOM for those with limited time who want a good workout.

Khalipa knows what it takes to be a top functional fitness competitor, and one of the biggest requirements is time. But for the vast majority of us who will never compete on CrossFit’s biggest stage, there IS a way to make fitness a part of our daily lives. With so many movements out there, it can be tough to prioritize which to drill, which weaknesses to work on, how to stack strength with endurance, etc. But Khalipa’s daily EMOM postings are a combo of all. Simple programming that hits the most necessary elements with a metabolic challenge rolled in.

We haven’t tried more than a few of these workouts yet, but we’d be very curious to see what would happen if someone trained these exclusively for a period of a couple weeks or more.

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BarBend's Co-Founder and Editorial Director, David is a veteran of the health & fitness industry, with nearly a decade of experience building and running editorial teams in the space. He also serves as a color commentator for both National and International weightlifting competitions, many through USA Weightlifting. David graduated from Harvard University and served for several years as Editorial Director/Chief Content Officer of Greatist.com. In addition to his work in the health & fitness industry, David has been a writer for Fortune and Fortune.com, as well as a contributor to Forbes.com, Slate, and numerous other outlets across the web and in print. He's especially passionate about the intersection of strength sports and quality, professional media coverage — overlapping interests shared by the BarBend editorial team and which drive their content strategy each and every day. David is a proud Kentucky native. In his free time, David is a voiceover actor and can be heard in animated films, independent shorts, music videos, commercials, and podcasts.