Watch Kara Saunders’ Best-on-Earth 18.5 Workout

The current Second Fittest Woman on Earth™ Kara Saunders was the only CrossFit® athlete, male or female, to break the 200-rep barrier in the 18.5 Open workout.

Saunders, who recently changed her name from Kara Webb after marrying Matt Saunders, pulled off an astonishing 201 reps at CrossFit Kova in Brisbane, Australia. As a reminder, this is the workout:

AMRAP in 7-minutes

3 Thrusters (100/65 lb) & 3 Chest-to-Bar Pull-Ups
6 Thrusters (100/65 lb) & 6 Chest-to-Bar Pull-Ups
9 Thrusters (100/65 lb) 9 Chest-to-Bar Pull-Ups

If you complete 9, complete a round of 12, then go on to 15, and so forth.

Score: Reps Completed

Watch Saunders’ set the world standard below.

She posted a shorter clip of the workout to her Instagram with a caption wrapping up her thoughts on the Open.

That’s a wrap. Just a few things I learned this year.

Owning an affiliate and trying to be the best in the world is hard.

@crossfit_kova members are very patient and understanding

Tantrums are not productive and make you feel like shit

The @concept2au Bike Erg is amazing to deal with frustration and anger

My hubby is my rock. I would crumble to pieces without him carrying me.

When you own a gym you carefully place your bar on the ground in an Open workout because you pay the bills (see video)

@romwod is an epic way to prep you for calm assertive comp WOD’s.

Despite all of the emotions and often falling short of your expectations it’s just exercise!!! It’s alllll good and by simply just trying your best you are a straight up winner.

The best men’s score was 198 reps, completed by the reigning Fittest Man on Earth™ Mat Fraser. Josh Bridges came second with 191 reps, and the two of them captured their workout on camera at CrossFit Mayhem.

Overall, Saunders came second worldwide in the Open with 193 points, right behind Cassidy Lance-Mcwherter’s winning 189 points. She came second in the 2017 Reebok CrossFit Games. We’re looking forward to her performance this year.

Featured image via @karawebb1 on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.