Polish powerlifter Krzysztof Wierzbicki calls himself Mr. Deadlift, and especially after his showing this weekend, that name is making a lot of sense.

Wierzbicki lifts in the International Powerlifting Federation (IPF) and has put up some insane numbers with the deadlift. Right now he weighs 99.6 kilograms (219.5 pounds) and, as you can see below in footage that was taken at an IPF-affiliated meet in Poland, he can deadlift 400 kilograms (881.8 pounds) raw — on a stiff bar, no less.

You can see Wierzbicki successfully pull 360 kilograms (793.7 pounds), 400 kilograms, and then almost make 408.5 kilograms (900.5 pounds), only to lose his grip at the very last second (and almost crush his foot in the process).

A man who prefers sumo deadlifts, Wierzbicki has taken home several records and currently holds the IPF classic open record for heaviest deadlift in the -93 kilogram class and the -105 kilogram class.

His -93 kilogram record was an equipped deadlift of 372.5 kilograms (821.2 pounds), which he performed in 2014 at the Classic Powerlifting Men’s Championships in Potchefstroom, South Africa.

(That lockout was pretty controversial, but the lift was nonetheless upheld.)

His -105kg class deadlift took place in Thisted, Denmark, where he pulled a mighty 390 kilograms, or 860 pounds, at the European Classic Powerlifting Championship just a couple of weeks ago.

In 2016, Wierzbicki also attended the Arnold Pro Deadlift contest in Columbus, Ohio, where he lifted 395 kilograms (870 pounds), earning him the heaviest deadlift at the contest ahead of Nick Weite’s 380 kilograms (837 pounds) and Joe Cappelino’s 362.5 kilograms (799 pounds).

Wierzbicki is intent on hitting that 408.5 kilogram deadlift that he missed this weekend. His Instagram is a chronicle of his attempts to continually best himself, and he posted a 410-kilogram deadlift he was unable to lock out a couple of weeks ago, with the caption simply reading “So close…”

According to his Instagram, Wierzbicki’s main goal is to one day total 950 kilograms, or 2,095 pounds. We’re unsure of the 27-year-old’s all-time heaviest squat and bench (counting training), but he certainly seems to have the tenacity.

Featured image via @mr.deadlift on Instagram.

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