Mattie Rogers Unofficially Broke the American Clean & Jerk Record

This Saturday in Miami, CrossFit Soul held a weightlifting meet called the MIA Summer Classic. It was a pretty informal event in that it wasn’t a national or international event — so new records can’t be set there — but the -69kg Mattie Rogers still hit a PR clean & jerk of 135 kilograms, or 297 pounds. Rogers currently holds the American record in the lift, which she set with 134 kilograms at this year’s USA Weightlifting National Championships.

We should note that Rogers is a -69kg athlete but she weighed 69.05 kilogams when she made this lift, so she wouldn’t have set a new American record if this was held in a national competition. Watch it below.

She posted with the caption,

Took my heavy training day to the @miaclassic this weekend. A nice little test to see where I’m at as we get closer to the final prep for Worlds. 135kg/297lbs clean and jerk at 69.05kg body weight.

Weights felt really good despite no real Deload, now time to tweak some technical things and continue the push towards worlds!

If you’re feeling nostalgic for her history-making performance from this year’s Nationals, you can watch all six of her attempts, which culminate in the 134kg clean & jerk, in this post below.

Rogers’ performance in the snatch at this weekend’s meet began with a miss of 100kg, then successful attempts of 100kg and 103kg. Her American record in the lift is 106kg.

She noted,

 A miss in competition at a PR attempt is one thing, but a technical miss just means it hasn’t been performed and successfully made enough times in training.

There is training enough to make the lift, then there is training enough to never miss the lift.

The main event for Mattie Rogers will be the Weightlifting World Championships in Anaheim, which will be held between November 28 and December 6 this year. Best of luck to her!

Featured image via @miaclassic on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.