How Your Maxes Compare to Some of the Best Athletes at Weightlifting Worlds

As we sit here watching some of the best weightlifting athletes in the world warm-up and finish their final lifts in the training hall at the IWF Weightlifting World Championships, I started thinking: “I wonder what training percentage my max is for some of these athletes.” 

More specifically, it was Lasha Talakhadze (easily) muscle snatching 120kg for a triple, and Mart Seim Squatting 325kg for five with ease that really brought this thought on.

A post shared by Mart Seim (@martseim) on

Obviously, it’s not exactly fair to compare yourself to the super heavyweight athletes, because there’s often a pretty substantial weight class difference, and not to mention they’re the best in the world. Yet, it’s still fun to compare for hypothetical purposes.

Below, we took some of the best competition lifts from an athlete in a women’s middle weight class, men’s middle weight class, and then Talakhadze. Before getting down about your best, remember these are some of the best athletes in the world!

Sara Ahmed, Women’s 69kg, Egypt

Ahmed made a splash with her bronze at the 2016 Rio Olympics by becoming the first ever Arab woman to receive a weightlifting medal, and the first Egyptian woman to receive an Olympic medal in any discipline.

In Rio, she recorded a 112kg snatch and a 143kg clean & jerk. Below are how your best snatch and clean & jerk compare to Ahmed’s Rio performance.

If Your Max Snatch Is: If Your Max Clean & Jerk Is:
60kg = 54% 70kg = 49%
70kg = 63% 80k = 56%
80kg = 71% 90kg = 63%
90kg = 80% 100kg = 70%
100kg = 89% 110kg = 77%

 

Kianoush Rostami, Men’s 85kg, Iran

Throughout all of 2016, Rostami had a great year. First, he set the 85kg clean & jerk world record with a successful 220kg attempt at the Fajr Cup. Then, he went on to win gold at the Rio Olympics with a commanding performance while setting an Olympic world record in the clean & jerk.

At the Rio Olympics, Rostami finished first in all three phases of competition, hitting a 179kg snatch and a 217kg Olympic record clean & jerk. Check the chart below to see how your maxes compare to Rostami’s Rio performance.

If Your Max Snatch Is: If Your Max Clean & Jerk Is:
85kg = 47% 90kg = 41%
100kg = 56% 100kg = 46%
115kg = 64% 120kg = 55%
130kg = 73% 140kg = 64%
145kg = 81% 160kg = 74%

 

Lasha Talakhadze, Men’s +105kg, Georgia

Talakhadze had a big 2016, winning gold at the Rio Olympics with a monstrous 215kg snatch, 258kg clean & jerk, and World Record 473kg total. Since, he’s kept that momentum going and had a great performance earlier this month at the Georgian Weightlifting Nationals.

At his last performance, Talakhadze finished the day with a 220kg snatch (setting an unofficial world record) and a 254kg clean & jerk. How do your maxes compare to Talakhadze’s Georgian Nationals performance? Check them out below.

If Your Max Snatch Is: If Your Max Clean & Jerk Is:
85kg = 39% 95kg = 37%
100kg = 46% 110kg = 43%
115kg = 52% 130kg = 51%
130kg = 59% 150kg = 59%
150kg = 68% 170kg = 67%

 

I know some of these charts can be a little disheartening, but hey, that’s why these athletes have earned the distinction of being of some of the best in the world. It is pretty crazy thinking that your max is most likely a warm-up set for most of these athletes.

Feature image screenshot from @rezi.davitadze Instagram page. 

Comments