Powerlifter Andrew Hause Totals Over 1,000kg At 20 Years Old

On Saturday, powerlifter Andrew Hause etched his name in the history books with his latest performance. At the RPS Braggin’ Rights powerlifting meet held in Greenville, North Carolina, Hause became the youngest athlete to total over 1,000kg in knee wraps. At the meet, Hause finished his performance by hitting a 1,002.5kg/2,210 lb total at the incredibly young age of 20.

Hause competed in 275 lb weight class, and his performance has now awarded him with the accolade the youngest powerlifter to surpass the 1,000kg/2,204 lb+ milestone.

If you recall, British 120kg+ powerlifter Luke Richardson accomplished this feat back in October when he totaled a monstrous 1,000kg/2,204 lbs at the Junior Mens Classic British Championships. At the time, Richardson was 21 years old, which was enough to edge out the previous accomplishment’s holder Eric Lilliebridge who totaled over 1,000kg/2,204 lbs at the age of 22. And yes, all three of these feats were performed under different competition criteria, but they’re all crazy impressive nonetheless. 

For the squat, Hause finished with a 407.5kg/898 lb second attempt, and missed a 420kg/926 lb third due to depth. On the bench press, Hause went 3/3 and cruised through his 225kg/496 lb third attempt.

On the deadlift, Hause smoked a 330kg/727 lb opener, then made his second 350kg/771 lb deadlift look easy. For his final attempt, Hause loaded the bar with 370kg/815 lbs and hit it with relative ease. In the video below, Hause also shares a successful fourth attempt deadlift that didn’t count towards his total with 377.5kg/832 lbs.

We’ve written on Hause before and highlighted his remarkable strength for his age. At the young age of 20, Hause definitely has room to grow and we’re excited to see what the future holds for this athlete.

Also, be sure to check out our recent article covering Stacy Burr’s performance at the same meet Hause competed in. For her performance, Burr fell one deadlift shy of breaking the all-time wraps Wilks Score — check that article out here!

Feature image from Powerhause YouTube channel.

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.