Rebecca Phillips Deadlifts 427lbs for Three Reps to Win GRID League Challenge

Rebecca Phillips, or Becky Guns as her Instagram handle rightfully states, is deadlifting big weight to win the most recent GRID Challenge. Phillips is a 69kg weightlifter for MASH Elite Performance. She recently won the latest GRID Combine challenge and took home first for her heavy three-rep deadlift.

She finished with the highest score for women and hit a 427.5lb deadlift in under 10-second for three reps. This particular event was called the Eleiko Challenge and consisted of hitting your best three-rep max deadlift in under 10-seconds for a $250 prize.

Other sports have their guidelines and rules, which help regulate the sport, so it’s cool seeing GRID attempt to do the same with lifting.

For example, the 10-second time limit could be a good thing and a bad thing in the last challenge. It’s good because it keeps athletes a little more true to their quickly executed three-rep max number. It could also be good to help prevent athletes from slowly grinding movements for the sake of competition. In some cases, this could be good for preventing injury.

Yet, the time limit could also be a bad thing due to carelessness of reps and lack of focus on mechanics. If you’re pulling a heavy three rep max in under 10-seconds, then it becomes harder to truly gauge and watch mechanics. For experienced athletes I don’t think this will be as much of an issue, but newer lifters should really focus on clean reps in the time frame.

GRID League has been growing in its popularity since its original release. Check out, Mike Farr (Silent Mike) below trying the GRID Challenge and pulling a heavy triple in under 10-seconds.

GRID League is a sport that has two teams facing off in a series of events including bodyweight lifts, weightlifting movements, and other athletic demands. Currently, the GRID League is hosting their 2017 Combine, which is a time where multiple strength athletes compete in weekly challenges.

This year, GRID has sponsor giveaways, which is new and could entice more athletes to join. The combine is the first step to becoming a pro GRID League contender and is a great way to compete in community filled with similar strength athletes.

Feature image from @becky_guns Instagram page. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.