USA Weightlifting Names Team for 2018 World University Championships

The 2018 FISU World University Weightlifting Championships will be held this September, and USA Weightlifting has released the names of their squad.

The World University Games, also called the Universiade (a combination of the words “university” and “olympiad”) is the largest multi-sport event in the world apart from the Olympic Games and it focuses on student athletes between the ages of 17 and 28.

Note that the following athletes were technically just named to the squad, and the final list of who will compete will be available closer to competition.

Female Athletes

-48kg

Veronica Restrepo (Philadelphia Barbell/ Montgomery Community College)

-53kg

Megan Grantom (Team L.A.B./ Missouri Southern State University)
Ellen Kercher (Stoneage Weightlifting Club/ Eastern Tennessee State University)

-58kg

Taylor Turner (Vero Beach Weightlifting/ Northern Michigan University)
Kaija Bramwell (Power and Grace Performance/ Brigham Young University)

-63kg

Allison Flemming (Florida Elite/ University of Central Florida)

-69kg

Aria Bremner (Harrisburg Weightlifting Club/ Florida State University)

-75kg

Lenore Namou (4 Star Strength/ Michigan State University)

-90kg

Kaitlyn Cooper (4 Star Strength/ Oakland University)
Maci Winn (Team Praxis/ Southern Utah University)

Male Athletes

-56kg

 Joseph Garcia (Crossfit Musclefarm/ Miami Dade Community College)    UnattachedMuscle Force Weightlifting

-69kg

Kenny Wilkins ( Vero Beach Weightlifting/ Northern Michigan University)

-77kg

Dominic Stolle (California Strength/ Texas Tech University)
Mohammad Omar (East Coast Gold/ Brookdale Community College)

-85kg

Christian Rodriguez Ocasio (Stoneage Weightlifting Club/ Eastern Tennessee State University)
David Lamb (Iron Beaver Weightlifting/ Oregon State University)

-94kg

Trevor Cuicchi (Iron Athlete Weightlifting Club/ Arizona State University)
Gregory Pulliam (Unattached/ University of West Georgia)

-105kg  

Matthew McCarty (West Michigan Muscle/ University of Michigan)
Nathan Lewis (Force Weightlifting/ Northern Michigan University)

USA Weightlifting’s Senior Director of Sports Performance and Coaching Education Mike Gattone said,

We’re proud to put such a strong team up on the International stage. This will be a great opportunity for these athletes to experience a world class event. We look forward to watching them win medals in Poland.

The FISU World University Weightlifting Championships will take place over September 20 to 23 in the town of Biala Podlaska, Poland.

Featured image via @chevynsville and @ronirestreps on Instagram.

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Nick is a content producer and journalist with over seven years’ experience reporting on four continents. His first articles about health were on a cholera outbreak in rural Kenya while he was reporting for a French humanitarian organization. His next writing job was covering the nightlife scene in Shanghai. He’s written on a lot of different kinds of things, but his passion for health ultimately led him to cover it full time.Shanghai was where he managed to publish his first health related article (it was on managing diarrhea), he then went on to produce a radio documentary about bodybuilding in Australia before he finished his Master’s degrees in Journalism and International Relations and headed to New York City. Here, he’s been writing on health full time for more than five years for outlets like Men's Health, VICE, and Popular Science.Nick’s interest in health kind of comes from an existential angle: how are we meant to live? How do we reach our potential? Does the body influence the mind? (Believe it or not, his politics Master’s focused on religion.)Questions like these took him through a lot of different areas of health and fitness like gymnastics, vegetarianism, kettlebell training, fasting, CrossFit, Paleo, and so on, until he realized (or decided) that strength training fit best with the ideas of continuous, measurable self improvement.At BarBend his writing focuses a little more on nutrition and long-form content with a heaping dose of strength training. His underlying belief is in the middle path: you don’t have to count every calorie and complete every workout in order to benefit from a healthy lifestyle and a stronger body. Plus, big traps are cool.