Bowflex PR3000 VS. Bowflex Blaze

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Bowflex home gyms can be a useful tool for a variety of gym-goers and fitness enthusiasts. They’re a great way to achieve a workout from the comfort of one’s own home, or work towards maintaining current fitness levels. When it comes to home gyms not all are created equal, and that’s why it’s so important to know all of the details before investing.

In terms of compact, versatile home gyms, Bowflex continually tries to innovate previous machines to match multiple fitness asks. For this article, we’ll analyze and break down the differences between the Bowflex PR3000 and the Bowflex Blaze. Both of these models contain similar attributes, but differ in some areas of importance.

Bowflex PR3000 Vs. Bowflex Blaze

Image courtesy Amazon.com.

[Looking for the best home gym for you? Read here and check out our full rundown of the top equipment for your needs!]

Key Specs and Features

Bowflex PR3000

The Bowflex PR3000 is one of Bowflex’s compact models, which means it doesn’t come with a bench. This specific model allows a gym-goer to perform over 50 exercises, and comes with additional workout content. If you buy this machine, then you get granted access to Bowflex’s Full Body Plan, which is their online workout resource.

Bowflex Blaze

The Bowflex Blaze, unlike the PR3000, comes with a fold down bench, which is nice for those wanting to perform supine movements. This piece of equipment allows a gym-goer to perform over 60 exercises, so it’s slightly more versatile than the PR3000, but not by much. In addition, this machine comes with workout content, which includes a detailed manual and workout DVD.

This is a close call, and in reality, both machines will be adequate with helping someone achieve a quality workout. The Blaze is slightly more versatile, but when push come to shove, I feel as though these machines are evenly matched and the deciding factor will probably be the fold down bench for many.

Winner: Tie 

Bowflex PR3000

Image courtesy Amazon.com.

Versatility

Bowflex PR3000

The Bowflex PR3000 offers a good amount of versatility, and like mentioned earlier, allows a gym-goer to perform over 50 exercises. It’s a compact model, so if you have an ask for a fold down bench for supine movements, then you may not like the PR3000. Other than that ask, I feel as though the Bowflex PR3000 offers a good amount of versatility. With 50 exercises, someone can perform full-body workouts, or dive into specific body part training.

Below are a few examples of the movements and muscles you can work with the Bowflex PR3000.

  • Legs: Leg extension, curl, and kickback 
  • Chest: Flat, incline, and decline press
  • Back: Lat pull-down with cables, row, lower back extension 
  • Arms: Bicep curls and tricep pushdown
  • Shoulders: Press, delt raise, shrugs 
  • Core: Ab crunch, trunk rotation, and oblique crunch 

Bowflex Blaze

As stated above, the Bowflex Blaze equips a lifter with over 60 exercise options, and a fold down bench. This is more than enough for someone trying to maintain their current fitness, just starting to workout, or even using this as their main workout resource. The Bowflex Blaze also comes with 210 lbs of power rod resistance, which is also a good amount for most gym-goers. And if that’s not enough, then one has the option to upgrade the resistance.

Check out a few of the exercises and muscle groups you can target with the tools the Bowflex Blaze comes with.

  • Legs: Leg extension, curl, and kickback 
  • Chest: Flat, incline, and decline press
  • Back: Lat pulldown, row, lower back extension 
  • Arms: Bicep curls and tricep pushdown
  • Shoulders: Press, delt raise, shrugs 
  • Core: Ab crunch, trunk rotation, and oblique crunch 

Both machines are very similar with their versatility, but if we’re only looking at this variable, then I feel as though the Blaze takes the win with the fold down bench and the additional 10+ exercises.

Winner: Bowflex Blaze 

Space Requirement

A usual concern for home gym buyers are the space requirements each piece of equipment will take up. Bowflex models are middle of the road when it comes to their space requirements. Each model is pretty consistent with each other, but there is some variance between them. If space is a major concern for you, then check out how the Bowflex PR3000 and Bowflex Blaze compare below.

The space requirements listed below are the maximal amount of space required by each machine in terms of their length, height, and width.

Bowflex ModelSpace Requirements
Bowflex PR3000Length: 96″, Width: 76″, Height: 83″
Bowflex BlazeLength: 90″, Width: 38″, Height: 83″

 

Winner: Bowflex Blaze 

Bowflex Blaze

Image courtesy Amazon.com. 

Price

Bowflex PR3000

Bowflex models all vary in price, and this price variation usually correlates with how long each model has been on the market. The Bowflex PR3000 starts around $689.00, which is a pretty decent price for what this machine offers. This price isn’t incredibly high, so most will likely not need to finance this equipment like some do with Bowflex’s newer models.

Bowflex Blaze

The Bowflex Blaze is slightly more expensive than the PR3000, and starts around $720.00. This isn’t too much more than the PR3000 and remember this model comes with 10 extra exercises, along with the fold down bench. In terms of price alone, this comparison is a close call, but the PR3000 edged out the Blaze by a $31.00 margin.

Winner: Bowflex PR3000

Warranty

Outside of the above variable, a machine’s warranty is also a big concern for many when purchasing a home gym. They’re a decent investment, and the last thing a gym-goer wants is to continually pump money into a machine that breaks down frequently. Bowflex offers some pretty solid warranty options, and we’ve included the full model’s warranty specs below. 

Bowflex ModelWarranty Specs 
Bowflex PR3000Frame: 1-year, Power Rods: 7-years, Parts: 60-days
Bowflex BlazeFrame: 1-year, Power Rods: 5-years, Parts: 60-days

 

Winner: Bowflex PR3000

Winner: Tie

This comparison comes out to a tie. In my opinion, both machines are very evenly matched with only a few differences in our compared variables. If your concern is versatility and space, then we’d recommend looking into the Bowflex Blaze. Conversely, if you don’t mind the tiny variance in versatility, and care more about price and warranty, then the Bowflex PR3000 is worth looking at.

[Find a great price on the Bowflex PR3000 straight from the manufacturer here.]

Both machines offer multiple similarities and can benefit multiple gym-goers. The differences are minimal and the perfect machine come down to one’s personal preferences.

Feature image courtesy Amazon.com. 

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Jake holds a Master's in Sports Science and a Bachelor's in Exercise Science. Currently, Jake serves as one of the full time writers and editors at BarBend. He's a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and has spoken at state conferences on the topics of writing in the fitness industry and building a brand. As of right now, Jake has published over 1,100 articles related to strength athletes and sports. Articles about powerlifting concepts, advanced strength & conditioning methods, and topics that sit atop a strong science foundation are Jake's bread-and-butter. On top of his personal writing, Jake edits and plans content for 15 writers and strength coaches who come from every strength sport.Prior to BarBend, Jake worked for two years as a strength and conditioning coach for hockey and lacrosse players, and was a writer at the Vitamin Shoppe's corporate office. Jake regularly competes in powerlifting in the 181 lb weight class, and considers himself a weightlifting shoe sneaker head. On the side of writing full time, Jake works as a part-time strength coach and works with clients through his personal business Concrete Athletics in Hoboken and New York City.